Aerospace & Defense

  • February 19, 2024

    Assange Poised To Make Final Bid To Halt Extradition To US

    Julian Assange will make what could be his final legal challenge on Tuesday in his long-running battle to avoid being sent to the U.S. on espionage charges arising from the publication of classified documents more than a decade ago.

  • February 16, 2024

    Nat'l Security Bar Kills Ex-Raytheon Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Fifth Circuit on Thursday refused to revive an engineer's claims that he was fired by defense contractor Raytheon for raising concerns about a naval system, saying that reviewing the case would implicate the Pentagon's protected decision to revoke his security clearance.

  • February 16, 2024

    You Want Judge Reyna To Have Coffee With Your Brief

    U.S. Circuit Judge Jimmie V. Reyna on Friday told intellectual property attorneys that the best way to establish credibility at the Federal Circuit is through a well-written brief, saying otherwise they put him in a bad position and deprive him of coffee.

  • February 16, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Boeing's Bid To Duck Birth Defect Suit

    A Washington state judge pressed Boeing on Friday to explain why it should get a "free pass" in a lawsuit over birth defects allegedly caused by factory workers' chemical exposure, questioning the aerospace giant's argument that it didn't have a duty to workers' future children based on foreseeable harm.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-FBI Field Boss Gets 28 Months For Foreign Payouts

    A former FBI field office supervisor was sentenced Friday to 28 months in prison for failing to disclose a $225,000 payment that he received from a former Albanian intelligence official while overseeing counterintelligence matters at the bureau.

  • February 16, 2024

    House Lawmakers Unveil $66.3B Military, Border Bill

    A bipartisan group of U.S. House of Representatives lawmakers introduced legislation on Friday that would provide $66.32 billion to support Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, as well as enact border reforms.

  • February 16, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Plaintiffs Seek Appeal Of Jury Trial Denial

    Two plaintiffs suing the federal government over water contamination at Camp Lejeune are asking a North Carolina federal court to allow them to appeal a judges' decision striking their bid for a jury trial, saying the issue is a novel question of law that should be answered sooner rather than later.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-ArentFox Client Tentatively Denied Conflict Case Discovery

    A California state judge tentatively ruled on Thursday that government contractor Peraton Corp. cannot get discovery for ArentFox Schiff's work for a business rival around the time it represented Peraton, saying since the discovery bid relates to an arbitration provision in Peraton's retainer, what happened after it was inked is irrelevant.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC Wants Licensing Revamp To Help Hatch Space Industries

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday proposed ways to streamline federal licensing needed to support an array of services in space, including manufacturing and parts assembly.

  • February 15, 2024

    SpaceX Heads To Texas After Musk's Tesla Pay Package Axed

    Elon Musk announced Wednesday that he is taking SpaceX's business incorporation from Delaware to Texas, after Delaware's chancellor last month struck down his proposed $55 billion Tesla pay package.

  • February 15, 2024

    House Committee Blasts VA, Oracle For E-Record Failures

    Lawmakers on Thursday rebuked the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Oracle Corp. for inadequate fixes to electronic medical records systems that they say continue to threaten the health and safety of thousands of veterans, who are not being advised of the risk.

  • February 15, 2024

    SpaceX Suit Over NLRB Structure Shipped To Calif.

    A Texas federal judge on Thursday granted the National Labor Relations Board's request to transfer SpaceX's lawsuit claiming the agency is unconstitutionally structured to California, saying the actions the company said allowed it to file in Texas were "incidental to the principal events occurring elsewhere."

  • February 15, 2024

    Bogus NSA Worker To Pay SEC $2.2M In Crypto Scam Case

    An alleged crypto fraudster who told would-be investors he was a former Marine and a onetime employee of the National Security Agency will pay over $2.2 million to end U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claims he faces in Florida federal court.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOJ Says It Disrupted Russian Router Malware Network

    The U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday it had disabled a network of office internet routers that were being used by a Russian intelligence unit to engage in malware campaigns against U.S. and foreign governments as well as military officials and corporations.

  • February 15, 2024

    La. Co. Fails To Prove Army Misled In $14M Canal Fix Deal

    A New Orleans contractor can't get cost adjustments on a $14.6 million deal with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to remediate canal erosion, after a dispute resolution board found no difference between the contract's description of the site and actual site conditions.

  • February 15, 2024

    Pearl Harbor Cleanup Needs Fuller Accounting, Watchdog Says

    Cleaning pollution from fuel spills near the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, could take decades, but the U.S. Department of Defense's reports to Congress only include cost estimates through this year, making planning difficult, a government watchdog has warned.

  • February 14, 2024

    What's Left Of Judge Newman's DC Suit Likely Won't Go Far

    A D.C. federal judge may be allowing suspended U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman to pursue a handful of arguments over the constitutionality of the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act, but attorneys told Law360 they aren't convinced those claims will fare any better than those already dismissed by the court.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Post Hoc' Args Doom Army Defense Of $11.5M Enviro Fix Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has sustained a Florida construction company's protest of an $11.5 million environmental remediation services deal for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, backing the company's claim the agency made unreasonable adjustments to its proposed cost.

  • February 14, 2024

    DOD Boosts Domestic Content Requirements For Contractors

    The U.S. Department of Defense finalized a rule Wednesday implementing the Biden's administration's increased domestic content requirements into its acquisition regulations, including DOD-specific requirements such as exceptions for countries in mutual defense trade deals with the U.S.

  • February 14, 2024

    House Rep. Green Plans Retirement After Mayorkas Fight

    Rep. Mark Green, R-Tenn., chair of the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, said Wednesday evening he will not seek reelection, an announcement that comes one day after he led the impeachment of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary.

  • February 14, 2024

    SEC Says Bankruptcy Doesn't Stop Crowdfunding Fraud Case

    Securities regulators are urging a Michigan federal judge to allow them to press on with their claims against the alleged mastermind behind a $2 million crowdfunding scheme — who has since quietly changed his name and allegedly bilked his attorney — arguing that his recent bankruptcy filing shouldn't pause proceedings.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-US Diplomat Pleads Not Guilty To Spying For Cuba

    A diplomat who served on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration and as U.S. ambassador to Bolivia entered a not guilty plea Wednesday to charges that he secretly acted as an agent of the Cuban government for decades.

  • February 14, 2024

    Deputy AG Warns Of Harsher Penalties For Crimes Aided By AI

    Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco on Wednesday said the U.S. Department of Justice will seek harsher penalties for crimes committed with the aid of artificial intelligence, calling the technology a "double-edged sword" that can be exploited by criminals but utilized by prosecutors with the right controls in place.

  • February 14, 2024

    Pentagon Rule Aims To Cut Iranian Fuel From Overseas Ops

    A proposed rule posted Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Defense would put contractors on the hook to prove that fuel they provide for military operations overseas was not sourced from prohibited countries such as Iran.

  • February 14, 2024

    Sen. Seeks Nuclear Strategy Review To Counter China, Russia

    Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., called on the Congressional Budget Office on Wednesday to outline potential nuclear strategies for the U.S. to pursue amid nuclear buildup in China and Russia's "disengagement" with the New START nuclear treaty.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Canada

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    In Canada, multiple statutes, regulations, common law and industry guidance address environmental, social and governance considerations, with debate over ESG in the business realm potentially growing on the horizon, say attorneys at Blakes.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • How US Companies Can Wield The New Foreign Bribery Law

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    U.S. companies operating in high-risk markets can use the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act that passed last month to their advantage both in preventing bribe demands and in negotiating with the Justice Department to prevent prosecution or to receive cooperation credit, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • How Gov't Use Of Suspension And Debarment Has Evolved

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    A recent report to Congress about federal agencies' suspension and debarment activities in fiscal years 2021 and 2022 shows exclusion remains a threat to government contracting businesses, though proactive engagement with suspending-and-debarring officials and alternate forms of redress are becoming more common, says David Robbins at Jenner & Block.

  • Protections May Exist For Cos. Affected By Red Sea Attacks

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    Companies whose ships or cargo have been affected by the evolving military conflict in the Red Sea, and the countries under whose flags those ships were traveling, may be able to seek redress through legal action against Yemen or Iran under certain international law mechanisms, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • What's On Tap For Public Corruption Prosecutions In 2024

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    All signs point toward another year of blockbuster public corruption prosecutions in 2024, revealing broader trends in enforcement and jurisprudence, and promising valuable lessons for defense strategy, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • The 5 Most Important Bid Protest Decisions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Bradley Arant discuss noteworthy 2023 bid protest decisions from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and U.S. Government Accountability Office, offering perspectives on standing, document production, agency deference, System for Award Management registration requirements and mentor-protégé joint venture proposal evaluations.

  • 4 Questions On Groundbreaking New Foreign Bribery Law

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    The recently enacted Foreign Extortion Prevention Act will significantly alter the anti-corruption landscape under U.S. law by allowing prosecutors to pursue foreign officials for soliciting or accepting bribes, but it’s not yet clear how the statute will be used and by whom, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • DOD's Proposed Cyber Rule: What Contractors Must Know

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    A review of the U.S. Department of Defense's recently published Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification proposed rule, requiring independent third-party cybersecurity assessments for many defense contractors, suggests that there will be a competitive advantage to prompt demonstration of full compliance with the rule, says Robert Metzger at Rogers Joseph.

  • Tips For Contractors Preparing For Potential Gov't Shutdown

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    With elements of the Congress’ latest continuing resolution expiring on Jan. 19, companies that may be fatigued by preparing for potential shutdown after potential shutdown should consider the current political climate and take specific steps now, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Expect National Security Scrutiny Of Higher Ed To Continue

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    In 2023, the federal government significantly elevated the national security responsibilities of academic communities, so universities and research laboratories should take a more rigorous approach to research partnerships, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

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