Aerospace & Defense

  • February 07, 2024

    Pratt & Whitney Docs Shielded From Airline's $30M Suit

    RTX Corp. subsidiary Pratt & Whitney won't be forced to hand over internal sales documents and communications as part of a $30 million feud between a competing airplane maintenance contractor and a British Airways affiliate that is playing out in an Illinois court, a Connecticut federal judge has ruled.

  • February 07, 2024

    Board Says Facts Need Sussing In ICE, Charter Biz $64M Battle

    The U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals has refused to grant summary judgment to either U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or an airline charter in a $64 million fight over canceled flights, saying too many factual disputes remain in the case.

  • February 07, 2024

    Contractor Admits To Sourcing Vital Military Parts Abroad

    A defense contractor admitted to illegally obtaining parts for the U.S. military from China and other foreign countries on contracts requiring the items to be purchased from domestic companies, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

  • February 07, 2024

    Senate Dems Push Biden To Boost Export Control Funding

    Democratic lawmakers from the Senate Banking Committee urged President Joe Biden to increase funding for export control enforcement in his upcoming budget request for fiscal year 2025, stressing the importance export controls have had on addressing national security risks.

  • February 07, 2024

    Engineer Charged With Stealing Missile Detection Designs

    An engineer who worked at an unnamed Malibu, California-based technology company stole trade secrets regarding nuclear missile detection after previously seeking to aid Chinese military research, the U.S. Department of Justice alleged in a criminal complaint unsealed Wednesday.

  • February 07, 2024

    Fla. Aircraft Co.'s Claims Narrowed In Hurricane Coverage Suit

    A Florida federal judge pumped the brakes on some of a Florida aircraft company's claims against its insurer related to its relocation in 2017 after Hurricane Irma, saying the company can't introduce previously concealed damages in the nearly $250,000 dispute. 

  • February 07, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Plaintiffs Can't Get Jury Trial In Water Suit

    A group of North Carolina federal judges overseeing the Camp Lejeune contaminated-water litigation have struck the plaintiffs' bid for a jury trial, finding the Camp Lejeune Justice Act does not clearly and affirmatively grant a right to a jury trial in an action against the government.

  • February 07, 2024

    Judge Newman's Suspension Upheld By US Panel

    The national panel that reviews judicial misconduct cases on Wednesday affirmed Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's suspension for refusing to undergo medical tests as part of a probe into her mental fitness, saying she hadn't shown good cause for not complying.

  • February 06, 2024

    SpaceX Accused Of Sex Harassment, Retaliation In Calif.

    California's Civil Rights Department has received complaints that SpaceX has fired engineers who raised concerns about sexual harassment, gender discrimination and a hostile work environment created by CEO Elon Musk's public comments, according to complaints viewed by Law360 on Tuesday.

  • February 06, 2024

    3rd Circ. Frees Coast Guard From Suit Over Rescue Attempt

    The U.S. can't be held civilly liable for the drowning death of a conch fisherman, the Third Circuit ruled Tuesday, saying the seaman's estate could only maintain claims if the U.S. Coast Guard's rescue mission had actually put the man in more danger.

  • February 06, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Review $1.3B India Award Fight

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday refused to revisit its decision overturning the enforcement of a $1.3 billion arbitral award issued to an Indian satellite communications company on jurisdictional grounds, despite a scathing dissent from several judges criticizing the appellate court's outlier position on the relevant issue.

  • February 06, 2024

    Amazon Says Class Cert. Not Appropriate In Military Bias Suit

    Claims that Amazon systematically demoted and fired workers who took military leave should not move forward on a class basis, the online retail giant said, telling a Washington federal court that evidence shows thousands of military workers took time off without a hitch.

  • February 06, 2024

    GOP Chided For Turning On Border Policies They 'Demanded'

    Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday criticized Republicans for turning on a $118 billion border security package ahead of a Senate vote scheduled for Wednesday, with Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., saying Republican lawmakers were renouncing border policies they themselves insisted on.

  • February 06, 2024

    Judge Accepts DHA's Course-Correct For $65B Tricare Deal

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims explained Tuesday why it cleared an embattled deal for healthcare services for the U.S. Department of Defense, saying the department appropriately handled claims challenging the winning company's small business participation plan.

  • February 06, 2024

    737 Max In Alaska Air Blowout Had 'Missing' Bolts, NTSB Says

    A mid-cabin panel that blew off a Boeing 737 Max 9 jet mid-flight last month appeared to have been missing four bolts meant to secure it in place, before the aircraft was ever delivered to Alaska Airlines, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report Tuesday.

  • February 06, 2024

    Toyota Sued For Fraud Over Maintenance Plan's Value

    Toyota allegedly deceived thousands of customers by falsely claiming its maintenance plan had a "superior value" to paying for each service individually, according to a proposed class action filed in California federal court Monday.

  • February 06, 2024

    Express Scripts Cites Low Bar To Keep AG Suit In Fed. Court

    Pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts Inc. pressed the Ninth Circuit on Monday to let it force its part of a California attorney general antitrust suit over skyrocketing insulin prices into federal court, arguing the enforcer and a U.S. district judge imposed the wrong standards in sending the case back to state court.

  • February 06, 2024

    Thousands Hit Feds With Third Suit Over Fuel Spill

    More than 2,200 military family members and civilians hit the U.S. government with a third suit over the Navy's allegedly negligent role in causing and responding to a large fuel leak affecting drinking water systems serving Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawai'i

  • February 06, 2024

    Feds Fight Sen. Menendez's Bids To Nix Charges, Split Trials

    Federal prosecutors have asked a New York federal court to reject requests from U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez to dismiss his corruption case and to sever his trial from his wife's, arguing that the senator made "premature" factual arguments and incorrectly claimed immunity from prosecution as a senator.

  • February 05, 2024

    SEC's SolarWinds Suit May Chill Disclosures, Ex-Officials Say

    A group of 21 former government officials from both Democratic and Republican administrations has urged a New York federal court to consider the possible chilling effects of public-private information sharing on cyber incidents in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's case against SolarWinds.

  • February 05, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Last week, Delaware's chancellor gave us 55 billion reasons to keep an eye on the First State in a case involving Tesla CEO Elon Musk's pay package, while the court of equity also took on cryptocurrency, artificial intelligence, space flight and country music.

  • February 05, 2024

    SpaceX Can't Show Harm In Constitutional Row, NLRB Says

    SpaceX hasn't proved how the company faces harm from the litigation of an unfair labor practice proceeding over its firing of eight Elon Musk critics, the National Labor Relations Board contended, defending the constitutionality of the agency's structure.

  • February 05, 2024

    Military Store Service Sued For Not Prioritizing Blind Vendors

    A military base store service run by the U.S. Department of Defense was sued in Texas federal court Friday for allegedly violating laws prioritizing blind merchants for opportunities to operate vending facilities on military bases when it opened a Fresh Market and other shops, while removing machines owned by blind merchants.

  • February 05, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Nabs Space Pro From Sherman & Howard

    Greenberg Traurig LLP announced Monday that it has hired former U.S. Air Force director of space law and chair of Sherman & Howard LLC's aerospace practice group Milton "Skip" Smith to head its space and satellite industry group.

  • February 05, 2024

    Discrepancy In Co. Name Can't Sink $4.5M Army Deal Dispute

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals has allowed an Iraqi contractor to proceed with its $4.5 million dispute over alleged unpaid invoices under a construction equipment deal, rejecting the U.S. Army's arguments that the claim and contract involved two different companies.

Expert Analysis

  • Inside DOD's Final Commercial Products And Services Rule

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    The recently released final amendment of a Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement provision will help streamline negotiations over subcontracts that provide commercial products and services, but its failure to address certain key questions means government contractors must still await further guidance, say Alex Sarria and Connor Farrell at Miller & Chevalier.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • What US-Canada Critical Minerals Collab Means For Cos.

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    Recent announcements from U.S. and Canadian officials indicate closer collaboration between the two governments on procurement of critical minerals for electric vehicles and other advanced technology — and companies on both sides of the border may have access to new opportunities as a result, say John Lushetsky, Matthew Simpson and Paul Dickerson at Mintz Levin.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Bias, Unequal Discussions, Timeliness

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, James Tucker at MoFo offers takeaways from three bid protests in the U.S. Government Accountability Office relating to the high standard for protests that allege agency bias, seeking revised proposals from just one offeror, and untimely objections to solicitation terms.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • What New DHS Cybersecurity Policy Means For Bid Protests

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    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's recently unveiled policy of factoring cybersecurity self-assessments into its overall evaluation of contractors could raise novel bid protest considerations for offerors in both the pre-award and post-award contexts, say Amy Hoang at Seyfarth and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • 1 Year In, Money Laundering Law Tweak May Have Big Impact

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    Despite receiving little attention, Congress' quiet extension of the statute of limitations for money laundering offenses involving foreign bribery offenses is a powerful prosecutorial tool that defense counsel can nevertheless counter by using certain pretrial challenges, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • How FinCEN's Proposed Rule Stirs The Pot On Crypto Mixing

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    The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network’s recently issued proposal aims to impose additional reporting requirements to mitigate the risks posed by convertible virtual currency mixing transactions, meaning financial institutions may need new monitoring techniques to detect CVC mixing beyond just exposure, say Jared Johnson and Jordan Yeagley at Buchanan Ingersoll.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Mexico

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    ESG has yet to become part of the DNA of the Mexican business model, but huge strides are being made in that direction, as more stakeholders demand that companies adopt, at the least, a modicum of sustainability commitments and demonstrate how they will meet them, says Carlos Escoto at Galicia Abogados.

  • Key Takeaways From DOJ's Recent FARA Advisory Opinions

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    The U.S. Department of Justice recently published several redacted advisory opinions on the Foreign Agents Registration Act, clarifying its current thinking on when a person or entity is required to register as a foreign agent under the statute, and when they may qualify for an exemption, says Tessa Capeloto at Wiley Rein.

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