Construction

  • April 30, 2024

    5th Circ. Backs La. Enviro Dept. In Gas Facility Permit Dispute

    A Fifth Circuit panel upheld the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality's permitting decision for a liquefied natural gas export facility, rejecting concerns raised by the Sierra Club that the facility's emissions will surpass national ambient air quality standards.

  • April 30, 2024

    Hospital Says IP Spat Shouldn't Delay Children's Center Build

    A Michigan hospital system has asked a judge to deny an attempt to block construction of a children's rehabilitation hospital, saying it did not copy its former architect's design and has made significant design pivots since terminating the firm's contract.

  • April 30, 2024

    Mich. Judge Admits Error In Cutting Predatory Lending Claims

    A Michigan federal judge admitted she was wrong to toss fair housing claims alleging a group of real estate companies ran a bulk home buying program that preyed on Black buyers, reviving the claims and reversing a decision to cut a defendant from the case.

  • April 29, 2024

    Split 7th Circ. Clears Insurers In O'Hare Steel Defect Fight

    A split Seventh Circuit affirmed Monday a finding that the Chicago O'Hare International Airport canopy's general contractor can't recoup more than $37.5 million in costs from its insurer over cracked welds in the canopy, finding that the defects in the welds and columns don't constitute property damage under its insurance policies.

  • April 29, 2024

    Herbert Smith Adds Bankruptcy Pro To Thai Disputes Practice

    Herbert Smith Freehills has hired an expert in construction disputes and insolvency and bankruptcy matters as a new partner for its Bangkok office, a move the firm says will strengthen its disputes practice in Thailand's capital.

  • April 29, 2024

    US, Tribes Defend Water Rule Against States', Biz Groups' Suit

    The federal government and several Native American tribes on Friday asked a North Dakota federal judge to toss a lawsuit by two dozen states challenging a rule defining the reach of the Clean Water Act's jurisdiction.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    Biden Admin's Border Wall Plan Must Be Vacated, Court Told

    Texas and Missouri again urged a federal judge Monday to vacate the Biden administration's plan to redirect congressional funding for a southern U.S. border wall as the White House pushed back, saying it would be an overreach to eliminate its directive.

  • April 29, 2024

    Trade Court Presses Commerce Dept. On Korean Electricity

    The question of whether South Korean authorities subsidize the country's steel producers is again before the trade court as of Monday, with the U.S. Department of Commerce heading into a third remand over a 2018 duty review.

  • April 29, 2024

    Builders Say State Rulemaking At Stake In Mich. PFAS Case

    A homebuilders' group has backed industrial giant 3M in urging the state's highest court to preserve a lower court ruling wiping out limits on forever chemicals, with a trade group official saying the decision could affect other state agency rulemaking.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ga. Judge Won't Approve $37K Settlement In FLSA Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has refused to approve a settlement between a corporate office furnisher and a former employee who says he was fired after complaining about being stiffed for hundreds of hours of compensable work, finding two provisions in the deal make it impossible to approve.

  • April 29, 2024

    Connecticut Quarry Crushed By Politics Gets Extra $1.2M

    The town of East Haven, Connecticut, and two former officials must pay an additional $1.2 million to a rock quarry that was forced to shutter due a purported political maneuver ahead of the 2017 mayoral race, on top of an existing award of $9.46 million in damages for lost profits, a federal judge has ruled.

  • April 29, 2024

    DOJ Not Required To Probe Alleged Bias In Boston Contracts

    A Boston federal judge won't second-guess a U.S. Department of Justice decision not to investigate allegations of systemic racism in the city's municipal contracting practices, deferring to the department's finding that it lacked jurisdiction for the claims.

  • April 29, 2024

    IRS To Open $6B 2nd Round Of Advanced Energy Tax Credits

    The IRS will start taking applications May 28 from project owners seeking to get part of a $6 billion second round of tax credits for developments that will support the clean energy industry, such as solar glass manufacturing and metal recycling facilities, the agency said Monday.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

  • April 26, 2024

    Support For 9th Circ. Rehearing In Oak Flat Dispute Mounting

    At least 100 religious and nonprofit groups, law scholars, Native American coalitions and tribes are urging the Ninth Circuit to consider a full panel en banc hearing on a challenge to block a copper mining company from destroying a sacred Indigenous religious site in central Arizona.

  • April 26, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: Homelessness, PFAS, Flood Zones

    Law360 Real Estate Authority covers the most important real estate deals, litigation, policies and trends. Catch up on this week's key developments by state — as well as on U.S. Supreme Court arguments over local homelessness policies, real estate attorney reactions to new rules on "forever chemicals," and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's latest take on building standards in flood zones.

  • April 26, 2024

    Panama Canal Project Fight Sent Back To Chancery

    A Delaware federal judge on Thursday remanded litigation arising from a lucrative port project near the Panama Canal in an order that also notes his "deep concerns" over a theory that the dispute belongs in arbitration, made by the companies accused of stealing control of the project.

  • April 26, 2024

    Pacific Territories Temporarily Freed From 'Buy America' Rules

    The Northern Mariana Islands, Guam and American Samoa are exempt from "Buy America" requirements for certain federally funded infrastructure projects until March 2025, according to a policy the U.S. Department of Transportation released Friday to reduce the far-flung territories' infrastructure costs.

  • April 26, 2024

    Colo. House OKs Lower Age For Historic Structure Tax Credit

    Colorado would reduce the age requirement for the properties eligible for the state's historic structures tax credit, postpone its sunset and make other changes under legislation approved by the state House on Friday.

  • April 25, 2024

    Ariz. Tribes, Groups Seek Stay In SunZia Power Line Ruling

    Native American tribes and environmentalists are asking an Arizona federal district court for an emergency injunction that would stay a ruling that rejected their bid to block work on SunZia's $10 billion transmission line while they appeal the decision, arguing that construction is already going ahead in culturally sensitive locations.

  • April 25, 2024

    9th Circ. Upholds $1.7M Injury Verdict Against Genie

    Equipment manufacturer Genie Industries Inc. can't upend a jury verdict and a $1.7 million judgment awarded to a Portland, Oregon, shipyard worker who was injured by the company's allegedly defective lift boom, the Ninth Circuit has ruled, rejecting the arguments that he failed to prove his injuries were permanent.

  • April 25, 2024

    McDermott Judge U-Turns, Says Some Investors Deserve Cert.

    A Texas federal magistrate judge reversed his recommendation that investors be denied class certification in litigation over McDermott International's $6 billion merger with Chicago Bridge & Iron, saying a former CB&I shareholder class "should be certified now" and a putative McDermott stock purchaser class be created for subsequent consideration.

  • April 25, 2024

    Ex-Philly Union Leader's 3rd Trial Ends In Deadlock

    A Pennsylvania federal jury on Thursday night was unable to reach a verdict in the government's case alleging former Philadelphia labor leader John Dougherty threatened a Live! Casino construction contractor with "financial ruin" if he didn't pay his electrician nephew for work he didn't perform, marking a mistrial for the previously twice-convicted union figurehead and his relative.

  • April 25, 2024

    Atty Sued For Malpractice Can't Rep His Firm, Ex-Client Says

    A Seattle real estate broker suing her former attorney for allegedly botching arbitration proceedings has told a Washington state judge that that attorney can't both be a defendant and represent his firm in their counterclaims for unpaid fees. 

Expert Analysis

  • 2 SEC Orders Illuminate Bribery Risks For US-China Cos.

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s foreign bribery-related resolutions with 3M and Clear Channel offer important takeaways on compliance risks for companies with operations in China, from the role of traditionally low-risk vendors to gaps in internal accounting controls, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Strict Duty To Indemnify Ruling Bucks Recent Trend

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    A South Carolina federal court's recent decision that it lacked subject matter jurisdiction to decide an insurer's duty to indemnify prior to the finding of insured liability sharply diverges from the more nuanced or multipronged standards established by multiple circuit courts, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Ex-OpenSea Staffer Case May Clarify When Info Is Property

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    In considering the appeal of a former OpenSea manager’s wire fraud conviction in U.S. v. Chastain, the Second Circuit may soon provide guidance about whether economic information is traditional property in certain insider trading prosecutions — a theory of fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly narrowed, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Opinion

    Stakeholder Amici Should Be Heard In Russian Trade Case

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    Although the U.S. Court of International Trade recently rejected U.S. Steel's amicus brief in NLMK Pennsylvania v. U.S., other industry stakeholders should seek to appear — and the court should allow it because additional perspectives will lead to a more informed ruling, say attorneys Jeffrey Shapiro and Michael Andrews.

  • Ill. Insurance Ruling Helps Developers, Community Orgs. Alike

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's decision in Acuity v. M/I Homes of Chicago, holding that commercial general liability policy exceptions did not prevent coverage for damage caused by faulty workmanship, will bring more potential insurance coverage for real estate developers and, in turn, larger payouts when community organizations sue them, say Howard Dakoff and Suzanne Karbarz Rovner at Levenfeld Pearlstein.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Supplementation, Conversion, Rejection

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Lyle Hedgecock and Michaela Thornton at MoFo discuss recent cases highlighting how the U.S. Government Accountability Office and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims consider supplementation of the record and an agency’s attempt to convert a sealed bid opportunity into a negotiated procurement, as well as an example of precedential drift.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

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