Georgia

  • May 01, 2024

    Muslim Recruit Says Atlanta PD Fired Him For Flagging Bias

    The Atlanta Police Department abruptly terminated a Muslim police officer recruit after he complained to management that fellow recruits had used profanity to mock his religion, scratched his car and stolen his uniform, a new lawsuit filed in Georgia federal court said.

  • May 01, 2024

    Georgia Co. Says City Must Pay $5M For Road Project Delays

    A Georgia paving company that sued the city of Smyrna for $5 million in damages after it allegedly pushed a multimillion-dollar road construction project past its completion deadline urged the Georgia Court of Appeals on Wednesday to overturn a trial court ruling that freed the city from its claims.

  • May 01, 2024

    53 Govs. Want Say In Moving Nat'l Guard Staff To Space Force

    The governors of 48 states and several U.S. territories warned the U.S. Department of Defense that allowing hundreds of Air National Guard personnel to be transferred to the U.S. Space Force without the governors' approval undermines their authority over their states' military readiness.

  • May 01, 2024

    In Trump Staredown With NY Judge, 'Somebody Has To Blink'

    Experts say Donald Trump will likely continue to ignore warnings from the court, and possibly his own attorneys, as his Manhattan hush money trial resumes Thursday with a fresh set of arguments over the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's out-of-court statements.

  • May 01, 2024

    Attys Say $5M Fee In Acella Settlement A Modest Proposal

    Plaintiffs' attorneys who recently reached a $46.5 million class action settlement with Acella Pharmaceuticals LLC over faulty thyroid medication asked a Georgia federal judge Tuesday to sign off on their $5 million cut of the deal as a "presumptively reasonable" proposal.

  • April 30, 2024

    Alaskan Builder Says Army Corps Delayed $41.2M Deal

    An Alaska construction company is protesting the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' decision to boot it off a $41.2 million military construction project for delays, telling the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that the Corps caused the delays.

  • April 30, 2024

    Lender Alleging Fraud Asks Court To Block Golf Club Sales

    A lender accusing the owner of multiple Atlanta golf clubs of defrauding it of more than $4 million has asked a Georgia federal court to block upcoming golf course sales to avoid the "imminent risk" that the borrower would hide the proceeds and dodge attempts to recoup losses from the alleged scheme.

  • April 30, 2024

    $626M Fee Award In BCBS Deal Is Unjust, High Court Told

    A member of the class that settled multidistrict litigation with Blue Cross Blue Shield for $2.67 billion over anti-competitive practices has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take up his challenge to the $626 million attorney fees award in the settlement, arguing the Eleventh Circuit's approval of the award runs counter to high court precedent.

  • April 30, 2024

    Red States Attack Biden's Title IX Gender Expansion

    A coalition of Republican-led states alleges the Biden administration illegally injected "gender ideology" in a rule expanding protection from discrimination in public education for people based on their gender identity or sexual orientation.

  • April 30, 2024

    Georgia EMS Co. Rife With Harassment And Abuse, Suit Says

    An Atlanta-based EMS provider was hit with a lawsuit by a former paramedic who says in under one year with the company, she faced a workplace rife with sexual harassment, domestic abuse, medical malpractice, retaliation and white supremacist affiliations.

  • April 30, 2024

    Trial Set For Lin Wood's Ex-Partners' Defamation Suit

    Controversial attorney Lin Wood will face trial in August in a defamation case brought by his former law partners who say he falsely accused them of trying to extort him, a Georgia federal judge decided Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ga. High Court Tosses Atty's Road Rage Murder Conviction

    The Supreme Court of Georgia threw out the murder conviction of a former corporate lawyer who was convicted of killing a real estate developer in a road rage incident, ruling Tuesday that the trial court erred by refusing to instruct the jury on the attorney's defense that the death was accidental.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-Rugby Team Owner Sues Over $6M Franchise Sale

    The former owner of an Atlanta, Georgia-based rugby team who sold it to a New Hampshire club for $6 million sued the buyer and another rugby team operator in Delaware federal court Monday, alleging that she is still owed $3.75 million from the sale.

  • April 29, 2024

    High Court Won't Revisit Class Cert. In Chili's Data Breach Row

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to review an Eleventh Circuit ruling that kept alive a class action claiming Chili's restaurants failed to protect customer data in a 2018 data breach that revealed millions of credit card records, which class counsel said "enshrines a path" toward compensation for consumers against companies that mishandle their data.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ohio, Ky. Reps. Again Try To Abolish PTAB

    U.S. Reps. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio, and Thomas Massie, R-Ky., have introduced a pair of bills aiming to overrule much of current patent law, including abolishing the Patent Trial and Appeal Board and making injunctions more common.

  • April 29, 2024

    Wells Fargo Didn't Pay For Out-Of-Shift Work, Suit Says

    Wells Fargo has for years enforced a companywide policy that denies overtime pay to workers tasked with opening and closing its branches, according to a lawsuit filed by a former employee at one of the bank's Atlanta-area locations.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ga. Judicial Watchdog Sets Date For Judge's Ethics Trial

    The ethics hearing of a Georgia judge accused of calling litigants names, sexually harassing attorneys and courthouse employees, and trying to get a friend's children out of legal trouble is set for June, according to an order filed Friday in the Georgia Supreme Court.

  • April 29, 2024

    GM, LexisNexis Hit With Another Driving Data Suit

    A Michigan driver told a Georgia federal court that his auto insurance rate increased after General Motors and its OnStar unit collected his driving data without consent and shared it with third parties, including data broker LexisNexis Risk Solutions, which then sold the data to insurers.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ga. Judge Won't Approve $37K Settlement In FLSA Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has refused to approve a settlement between a corporate office furnisher and a former employee who says he was fired after complaining about being stiffed for hundreds of hours of compensable work, finding two provisions in the deal make it impossible to approve.

  • April 29, 2024

    11th Circ. Should Nix Tax Court Judges' Shield, Widow Says

    The widow of a supermarket butcher told the Eleventh Circuit that the U.S. Tax Court not only wrongly upheld tax liabilities against her stemming from her husband's tax filings but also erroneously affirmed unconstitutional job protections for its judges. 

  • April 29, 2024

    TitleMax Says Class Plaintiff Lied To Get 'Usurious' Loan

    TitleMax hit back Friday at a proposed class action accusing the company of extending thousands of loans with exorbitant interest rates to military members, alleging that the suit's lead plaintiff lied on her own loan application to get the line of credit she's now suing over.

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices To Scrutinize Revoked Visa Petition

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to examine an Eleventh Circuit decision that federal courts lack authority to review the revocation of a previously approved visa petition for a Palestinian man whose marriage was found to fraudulently skirt immigration laws.

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices Skip Atty's Race Bias Suit Over Paid Suspension

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to wade into a former congressman's case alleging a nonprofit legal aid firm violated Title VII's ban on race discrimination when it suspended him with pay, passing on the chance to apply a newly crafted high court standard addressing what kinds of workplace actions can sustain a bias lawsuit. 

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

Expert Analysis

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • What's Ahead For Immigrant Employee Rights Enforcement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s increased enforcement related to immigration-based employment discrimination is coupled with pending constitutional challenges to administrative tribunals, suggesting employers should leverage those headwinds when facing investigations or class action-style litigation, say attorneys at Jones Day.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Top 10 Whistleblowing And Retaliation Events Of 2023

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and federal and state courts made 2023 another groundbreaking year for whistleblower litigation and retaliation developments, including the SEC’s massive whistleblower awards, which are likely to continue into 2024 and further incentivize individuals to submit tips, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Still Murky After A Choppy 2023

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    This year brought several important Clean Water Act jurisdictional developments, including multiple agency rules and a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that substantially altered the definition of "waters of the United States," but a new wave of litigation challenges has already begun, with no clear end in sight, say attorneys at Nossaman.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Trump NY Fraud Trial Shows Civil, Criminal Case Differences

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    Former President Donald Trump’s civil fraud trial currently unfolding in New York provides a reminder that civil bench trials can be just as damaging, if not more so, than criminal prosecutions, due to several key elements of civil litigation procedure, says retired attorney David Moskowitz.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

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