Government Contracts

  • April 02, 2024

    Ga. Judge Tosses Ex-Police Chief's Retaliation Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has freed the city of Austell from a lawsuit brought against it by its former police chief, who alleged that he was forced out of his job after three years of raising concerns about the safety of department facilities.

  • April 02, 2024

    Casino Outfits Say High Court Must Review Tribal Betting Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court is the correct venue for a case by two casino operators that seek to undo a tribal gaming compact in Florida now that the state's Supreme Court has refused to take up the case, one of the companies has told the nation's highest court.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ally Of NYC Mayor Skirts Prison In Straw Donor Case

    A friend and former colleague of New York City Mayor Eric Adams on Tuesday was spared any time in prison following his admission to conspiring to use straw donors to juice the public funding of the mayor's 2021 campaign.

  • April 02, 2024

    Conn. Dentists Used Illegal Patient Recruiting, Suit Says

    Federal and state authorities filed a kickback and false claims lawsuit in Connecticut federal court on Tuesday against two dental practices in the state and their co-owners for allegedly paying a patient recruiter to generate business through Medicaid.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Army Officer Says Gov't Smeared Him With False Claims

    A former major general in the U.S. Army on Tuesday sued the U.S. Department of Defense and others, alleging that the government wrongly recorded him as having assaulted his partner, despite her recanting the allegations and admitting they were a ploy to seek attention.

  • April 02, 2024

    JFK Taxi Dispatchers Charged With Taking Bribes For Rides

    Nine taxi dispatchers at John F. Kennedy International Airport have been charged with accepting cash bribes in exchange for allowing drivers to skip the line to pick up passengers, the Queens district attorney has announced.

  • April 02, 2024

    USPTO Targeted In Brothers' Patent Litigation Campaign

    Two brothers who are software engineers and claim to have invented two-factor authorization are accusing the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office of infringing their patents with its sign-in website.

  • April 02, 2024

    Del. Justices Agree To Review Ex-Xerox Unit Coverage Row

    The Delaware Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to review a lower court's decision to set aside a jury verdict finding that an ex-Xerox unit tried to defraud its insurers into providing coverage for a portion of a $236 million Medicaid fraud-related settlement with Texas.

  • April 02, 2024

    King & Spalding Lands 3 Kasowitz Partners For Biz Litigation

    King & Spalding LLP announced Tuesday that it had hired three partners for its business litigation practice from Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP, including the co-chair of Kasowitz's real estate litigation practice group. 

  • April 02, 2024

    Okla. High Court Denies Gov.'s Veto Suit Over Tribal Compacts

    The Oklahoma Supreme Court on Tuesday denied Gov. Kevin Stitt's suit against state lawmakers over two veto overrides on tribal tobacco and motor vehicle compacts, saying the executive branch doesn't have exclusive authority to negotiate state-tribal compacts.

  • April 02, 2024

    Another Judge Says Feds Overstepped With GHG Rule

    A Kentucky federal judge has sided with Kentucky and 20 other Republican-led states, ruling that the Federal Highway Administration overstepped its authority with a rule directing states to set targets for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • April 01, 2024

    Cybersecurity Heads Back SolarWinds' Push To Nix SEC Suit

    Cybersecurity experts from dozens of private companies decried the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's lawsuit against SolarWinds and its cybersecurity head, arguing the unprecedented effort to hold the pair accountable for a 2020 cyberattack could undermine U.S. national security.

  • April 01, 2024

    Tribe, Allies Defend Standing To Fight Corps' Fish Farm Permit

    The Army Corps of Engineers is trying to "muddy the water" to fend off a challenge to a nationwide permit opening ocean waters to aquaculture operations, failing to justify why the permit shouldn't be scrapped, the Quinault Indian Nation and nonprofit allies have told a Washington federal judge.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Pharma Co. Exec Denies Signing Noncompete Deal

    The former director of government sales for a pharmaceutical company asked the North Carolina Business Court on Friday to knock out a breach of contract claim in a lawsuit that alleges he took trade secrets to a competitor, arguing the company has no valid noncompete agreement to back it up.

  • April 01, 2024

    BOP Drops Accreditation Org After IG, Sens. Raise Concerns

    The Federal Bureau of Prisons has let its $2.75 million contract with its accreditation organization expire, after a group of Democratic lawmakers and the bureau's watchdog raised concerns that the group wasn't effective or objective.

  • April 01, 2024

    DeSantis Ducks Mass. Suit Over Migrant Flights

    A Massachusetts federal judge has released Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and most other defendants from a proposed class suit by a group of migrants who claim they were duped into boarding flights to Martha's Vineyard, ruling that the court lacked jurisdiction.

  • April 01, 2024

    Colo. Judge Pleads For Brevity In Palantir Shareholder Suit

    A Colorado federal judge has dismissed without prejudice a shareholder suit against software and analytics company Palantir Technologies, criticizing the redundancy and excessive length of the complaint, and chastising the plaintiffs for seemingly expecting him to sift through alleged fraudulent statements for them.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fla. Atty Can't Escape $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A Florida attorney fell short in trying to nix her conviction for conspiracy to commit wire fraud when a Georgia federal court found the jury heard and saw a "plethora" of evidence to show she submitted fraudulent loan applications in an effort to obtain money meant to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Wary Of Defense Co.'s Late $19.4M Pension Claim

    The Federal Circuit appeared skeptical Monday of an aviation defense company's attempt to revive pension claims against the federal government, as judges on the panel questioned the implications of reviving a claim outside the six-year statute of limitations.

  • April 01, 2024

    High Court Won't Hear Mass. Residents' Tribal Land Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday denied a petition by a group of Massachusetts residents seeking to reverse a ruling that allowed the Department of the Interior to take 321 acres into trust for the development of a billion-dollar tribal hotel and casino.

  • March 29, 2024

    High Bar To Meet For Novel Protest Over $45B DOE Deal

    The U.S. Department of Energy's deviation from typical federal acquisition rules to award a $45 billion contract to a company previously deemed ineligible is raising eyebrows among government contracting attorneys, but may nonetheless find support in court.

  • March 29, 2024

    GEO Group Brass Agree To Reforms To End Derivative Suit

    Shareholders who claimed executives of private prison contractor GEO Group Inc. lied about financing deals with major banks told a Florida federal judge that the company has agreed to a host of corporate reforms to end the derivative suit, which will include the appointment of a chief compliance officer.

  • March 29, 2024

    Navy Overspent $399M In Ukraine Funding In 2022, DOD Says

    The U.S. Department of Defense said that lax financial controls in the U.S. Navy's budgeting system led it to overspend nearly $400 million in funds intended to help Ukraine following Russia's 2022 invasion, which has also increased the risk of triggering a possible Antideficiency Act violation in the future.

  • March 29, 2024

    RTX Cut From Deal Due To Worker's 'Likely' NDA Violation

    RTX Corp. can't be part of an anti-missile technology program following its hiring of a former naval analyst who may have violated a non-disclosure agreement while still employed with the Navy, a U.S. Court of Federal Claims decision unsealed Friday shows.

  • March 29, 2024

    L3Harris Accuses Moog Of Delays In Subdeals Worth $77.9M

    L3Harris Technologies Inc. has hauled fellow defense contractor Moog Inc. into Florida federal court, alleging that Moog failed to timely deliver critical satellite parts under several subcontracts worth $77.9 million, despite the U.S. government requiring expedited delivery for national defense purposes.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Opinion

    Biden Admin's March-In Plan Would Hurt Medical Innovation

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    The Biden administration's proposal to reinterpret the Bayh-Dole Act and allow the government to claw back patents when it determines that a commercialized product's price is too high would discourage private investment in important research and development, says Ken Thorpe at the Rollins School of Public Health.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • How DOD Can Improve Flexibility Under Proposed Cyber Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Defense should carefully address some of the more nuanced aspects of the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program to avoid unintended consequences, specifically the proposal to severely limit contractor use of plans of actions and milestones, say Joshua Duvall at Maynard Nexsen and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify When Gov't Clawback Is Timely

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    The Federal Circuit’s examination of claims accrual in a January decision that allows the Defense Contract Management Agency to pursue overpayment claims under a cost-reimbursement contract serves as a reminder that the government can lose such claims by waiting too long to file, say Evan Sherwood and Peter Hutt at Covington.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • How 3 New Laws Change Calif. Nonprofits' Legal Landscape

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    Legislation that went into effect on Jan. 1 should be welcomed by California’s nonprofit organizations, which may now receive funding more quickly, rectify past noncompliance more easily and have greater access to the states’ security funding program, say Casey Williams and Brett Overby at Liebert Cassidy.

  • ChristianaCare Settlement Reveals FCA Pitfalls For Hospitals

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    ChristianaCare's False Claims Act settlement in December is the first one based on a hospital allegedly providing private physicians with free services in the form of hospital-employed clinicians and provides important compliance lessons as the government ramps up scrutiny of compensation arrangements, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

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    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Opinion

    The PLUS Act Is The Best Choice For Veterans

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    Of two currently pending federal legislative proposals, the Preserving Lawful Utilization of Services Act's plan to diversify and expedite the processing of veterans' claims through an expanded network of accredited providers offers the better solution, say Michael Andrews at McGuireWoods and Matthew Feehan at Nearside Solutions.

  • Skirting Anti-Kickback Causation Standard Amid Circuit Split

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    Amid the federal circuit court split over the causation standard applicable to False Claims Act cases involving Anti-Kickback Statute violations, which the First Circuit will soon consider in U.S. v. Regeneron, litigators aiming to circumvent the heightened standard should contemplate certain strategies, say Matthew Modafferi and Terence Park at Frier Levitt.

  • What New Calif. Strike Force Means For White Collar Crimes

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    The recently announced Central District of California strike force targeting complex corporate and securities fraud — following the Northern District of California's model — combines experienced prosecutorial leadership and partnerships with federal agencies like the IRS and FBI, and could result in an uptick in the number of cases and speed of proceedings, say attorneys at MoFo.

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