Government Contracts

  • March 08, 2024

    Colo. Dispensary And Tracking Vendor Settle Fee Suit

    A Colorado state judge has called off a trial between a dispensary chain and Metrc LLC, the company contracted by the state to track cannabis sales, after the two agreed to settle a lawsuit the retailer filed over monthly fees the vendor charged for its state-mandated services.

  • March 08, 2024

    FCC Says There's No Order To Appeal In IT Fund Suspension

    The D.C. Circuit shouldn't rush to hear a case accusing the Federal Communications Commission of dragging its feet on releasing subsidy funds for tech support at grade schools because there's no order from the FCC to be appealed, the agency has said.

  • March 08, 2024

    IRS Leaker Should Be Deposed Without All Docs, Judge Says

    Attorneys for a hedge fund executive should question the former IRS contractor who admitted to stealing the tax returns of him and others, even though the IRS hasn't finished producing evidence in the case seeking to hold the agency responsible for the leak, a Florida federal judge said Friday.

  • March 08, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Argues Judge Newman's Ethics Law Challenge Fails

    A D.C. federal judge must reject suspended U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's challenge to the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act, as her constitutional arguments are too limited, the Federal Circuit Judicial Council said Friday.

  • March 08, 2024

    Ohio Panel Revives Gov't Contract Overseer's Breach Suit

    An Ohio appellate court revived a government contract administration company's suit against a state agency it claimed cut its revenue by millions by diverting potential projects from the firm despite their third-party administrator contract, reversing a lower court's decision that the claim was filed too late.

  • March 08, 2024

    Big Shift Unlikely In Cybersecurity Regs, Despite Concerns

    The U.S. Department of Defense is unlikely to significantly alter its cybersecurity proposals for contractors, despite calls from its private industry base for more flexibility and clarity.

  • March 07, 2024

    Ginnie Mae Says Texas Bank Can't Use Oral Promises In Suit

    The Government National Mortgage Association told a Texas federal court Wednesday that even if it made oral promises not to void a Texas Capital Bank's interest in a first-priority lien on a multimillion-dollar emergency loan, those promises don't hold up legally and the case should be dismissed.

  • March 07, 2024

    Judges Say Facing Threats And Vitriol Now Part Of The Job

    Federal judges spoke Thursday about the challenges of the profession in the 21st century, describing how they've either received threats or know of warnings against colleagues, with one jurist saying she received 11 death threats during her first three months on the bench.

  • March 07, 2024

    11th Circ. Urged To Restore Qui Tam Over Small Biz Contracts

    The U.S. Department of Justice argued Thursday in support of reinstating a qui tam lawsuit against two companies that gained control of a small Florida construction business, telling the Eleventh Circuit that they were not qualified for a government program that awards contracts to firms owned by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals.

  • March 07, 2024

    Shipbuilder Says Navy Ended Deal in Bad Faith, Seeks $150M

    A Louisiana shipbuilder accused the U.S. Navy of doing everything it could to thwart the company's success on a craft-building deal, telling a Court of Federal Claims judge it deserved at least $150 million for the Navy's alleged bad faith.

  • March 07, 2024

    Deputy AG Unveils DOJ Whistleblower Rewards Pilot Program

    Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco on Thursday said the U.S. Department of Justice will soon begin a pilot program to financially reward whistleblowers who alert prosecutors to significant corporate misconduct.

  • March 07, 2024

    White House Moves To End Highway 'Buy America' Waivers

    The Biden administration on Thursday proposed eliminating waivers to domestic production requirements for items used in federal highway building.

  • March 07, 2024

    US Soldier Charged With Selling Military Secrets To China

    A U.S. Army intelligence analyst with the rank of sergeant sold an array of sensitive and classified military secrets to China in exchange for $42,000, according to a Tennessee grand jury indictment unsealed on Thursday. 

  • March 07, 2024

    Feds Get 1st Plea In Massive NYC Housing Bribery Case

    A former public housing superintendent for the New York City Housing Authority on Thursday became the first of 70 workers charged in Manhattan federal court with bribery last month to plead guilty.

  • March 07, 2024

    CenturyLink Cut From Suit Blaming Utilities For Road Delays

    The city of Sammamish, Washington, has quietly dropped CenturyLink from a state court lawsuit accusing it, Comcast and other companies of causing millions of dollars in roadwork delays by failing to move their infrastructure in a timely manner.

  • March 07, 2024

    Claims Court Backs VA Redo Of Eyewear Deal Over Errors

    A Court of Federal Claims judge tossed an eyewear manufacturer's bid to be reinstated to a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs optometry deal, saying the VA was allowed to cancel the award in light of calculation errors the agency made.

  • March 07, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says IP License May Be Part Of Procurement Deal

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday revived a software developer's claims that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration misappropriated its data, saying the developer had sufficiently alleged it was party to a government contract that allowed lawsuits under the Contract Disputes Act.

  • March 07, 2024

    Conn. Psychologist Agrees To Repay $2.65M For Billing Fraud

    A Connecticut psychologist already sentenced to 27 months in federal prison for his second alleged healthcare fraud scheme has agreed to a plan to repay $2.65 million in restitution under a proposed order that awaits approval from a federal judge.

  • March 07, 2024

    Monsanto, Seattle Spar Over Guardrails For Possible PCB Trial

    Monsanto Co. and Seattle are wrangling over evidentiary matters in the city's suit over PCB pollution in the Lower Duwamish Waterway, with each side asking a Washington federal judge to impose limits for a possible trial that's currently set for September.

  • March 06, 2024

    Top Calif. Antitrust Atty Says Criminal Cases On The Horizon

    California is poised to start prosecuting criminal antitrust cases under a Golden State law that is "broader" than federal law, a senior assistant attorney general for the California Department of Justice said Wednesday at a San Francisco conference.

  • March 06, 2024

    Garland On AI Crime, And A Taylor Swift Tune For DOJ

    U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland on Wednesday told a group of lawyers gathered in San Francisco that the U.S. Department of Justice is ramping up its hiring of computer scientists to fight artificial intelligence-driven crime and also revealed which Taylor Swift song he thought should be the department's anthem.

  • March 06, 2024

    Federal Lawmakers Want To Protect 172 Acres For Calif. Tribe

    Legislation introduced by two U.S. senators would place 172 acres into trust for a California tribe in an effort to bring its members back to its reservation where they can develop a permanent home.

  • March 06, 2024

    Pa. Pharma Co. Cops To Adulterated-Drug Charges

    A Pennsylvania generic drug manufacturer has pled guilty to federal charges that it sold adulterated drugs in the U.S. into interstate commerce and agreed to pay a $1.5 million penalty, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

  • March 06, 2024

    DOJ Says Another Korean Co., Officer Behind Bid-Rig Scheme

    A second South Korean company and its CEO allegedly defrauded the Pentagon in a scheme to rig bids and fix prices for subcontract work on U.S. military installations in South Korea, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

  • March 06, 2024

    Experts Urge 'Transformational' Change To DOD Budgeting

    An expert panel urged the U.S. Department of Defense on Wednesday to make a "transformational change" to its budgeting and resource allocation processes, saying the DOD's current processes limit effective and timely responses to changing needs and technologies.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look At Successful Bid Protests In FY 2023

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    Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin look beyond the statistics in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s recent annual report on bid protests, sharing their insights about nine categories of sustained protests, gained from reading every fiscal year 2023 decision in which the protester had a positive result.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • AI Use May Trigger False Claims Act's Public Disclosure Bar

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    The likely use of publicly available artificial intelligence tools to detect government fraud by combing through large data sets will raise complex questions about a False Claims Act provision that prohibits the filing of claims based on previously disclosed information, say Nick Peterson and Spencer Brooks at Wiley Rein.

  • Biden Climate Push Expands With Contractor GHG Focus

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    President Joe Biden's recent announcement that federal agencies will consider contractors' greenhouse gas emissions when making procurement decisions demonstrates his administration's continued interest in using government contracting as a vehicle for reducing climate-related impacts — a theme first established in the early months of his term, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Unpacking GAO's FY 2023 Bid Protest Report

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    The U.S. Government Accountability Office's recent bid protest report reflects an increase in sustained protests, illustrating that disappointed offerors may see little reason to refrain from seeking corrective action — but there is more to the story, say Aron Beezley and Patrick Quigley at Bradley Arant.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • A Closer Look At Proposed HHS Research Misconduct Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' proposed updates to its policies on research misconduct codify many well-known best practices, but also contain some potential surprises for the research community and counsel, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Suspension And Debarment: FY 2023 By The Numbers

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    A comparative analysis of System for Award Management data, culminating with fiscal year 2023, reveals a year-over-year drop in annual suspension and debarment numbers so significant as to leave the government contracting community trying to figure out what is happening, says David Robbins at Jenner & Block.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Contracts Disputes Recap: Expect Strict Application Of Rules

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    Zachary Jacobson and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine four recent cases highlighting the importance, for both contractors and government agencies, of strict compliance with the Contract Disputes Act’s jurisdictional requirements and with the Federal Acquisition Regulation's remedy-granting clauses.

  • Unpacking The FAR Council's Cybersecurity Rules Proposal

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    New reporting and information sharing requirements in the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed cybersecurity regulations would create new False Claims Act enforceability risks, and could be a focus for the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Cyber Fraud Initiative, say Townsend Bourne and Lillia Damalouji at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

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