Government Contracts

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Can't Offset Nuclear Cleanup Bill With Trusts' Earnings

    The U.S. Department of Energy wasn't able to convince the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that nuclear utilities' high earnings on nuclear decommissioning funds should erase their $149 million damages claim against the department for delayed nuclear waste cleanup, according to an opinion made public this week.

  • February 22, 2024

    ICE's Immunity Bars Bulk Of Virus Death Suit, For Now

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has for now dodged most of a lawsuit over the death of a man who contracted COVID-19 in detention, after a California federal court ruled that sovereign immunity barred most of the case.

  • February 22, 2024

    GAO Backs VA's Need For Licensed Contractor

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office backed the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' requirement for an Illinois company to be licensed in Oregon for a security guard service deal in the state, rejecting the company's contention that the requirement unduly restricted competition.

  • February 22, 2024

    Esformes Gets Time Served In Plea Deal With Gov't

    The yearslong prosecution against Miami nursing home mogul Philip Esformes ended Thursday when he pled guilty to one of the pending healthcare fraud charges against him and was sentenced to time served.

  • February 21, 2024

    Contractor Says Lima Merits Sanctions In $140M Award Row

    A municipal contractor has asked a D.C. federal court to sanction Lima, Peru, for prolonging its efforts to enforce nearly $140 million in arbitral awards it won over a highway contract that went awry, saying the city has unnecessarily prolonged the dispute with two actions.

  • February 21, 2024

    'Cyber Trust Mark' Will Get Vote At Next FCC Meeting

    The proposed "U.S. Cyber Trust Mark" for "smart" products will come up for a vote at the Federal Communications Commission next month, FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    GAO Backs Army Rejection Of Unclear Bid For Deals In Korea

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has agreed with the U.S. Army's decision to deem unacceptable an engineering firm's bid for construction deals in South Korea, as the watchdog found the bids unclear on who would perform certain quality control and safety activities.

  • February 21, 2024

    GAO Says IT Co. Challenging $79M Gov't Deal Wasn't Misled

    A Virginia information technology company lost its protest of a $79 million U.S. Special Operations Command deal for cybersecurity services after the U.S. Government Accountability Office rejected its contention that USSOCOM engaged in misleading and unfair discussions during procurement.

  • February 21, 2024

    Boston Faces Suit Over Women's Soccer Stadium Project

    The city of Boston was slammed with a complaint in Massachusetts Superior Court by a nonprofit organization seeking to halt the city's pending privatization of the George Robert White Memorial Stadium in order to transform it into a women's professional soccer stadium.

  • February 21, 2024

    PE Firm Can't Shake Ex-CEO's Retaliation Suit In NC

    A North Carolina federal judge has maintained the bulk of a former executive's suit accusing a private equity firm of duping him into accepting a top role at a defense supply unit and firing him when he refused to hide the company's financial reality from a major defense contractor client, reasoning that he satisfied pleading standards.

  • February 21, 2024

    Feds Found Responsible For Leased Building's Contamination

    The Civilian Board of Contract Appeals has ruled that the federal government is liable for piscicide contamination of a building long used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, but is on the hook only for diminished value and not full restoration.

  • February 21, 2024

    Boeing Ousts Head Of Embattled 737 Max Program

    Boeing on Wednesday replaced the chief of its 737 Max program as the American aerospace giant rejiggers the executive team overseeing its most popular line of jets after high-profile safety mishaps such as last month's midair panel blowout and two deadly crashes overseas five years ago.

  • February 20, 2024

    Liberal Justices Hint Chevron Deference Hanging By A Thread

    In the U.S. Supreme Court's latest battle royal over administrative powers, left-leaning justices at oral arguments Tuesday openly suggested that the landmark legal doctrine underpinning modern rulemaking might soon shrivel up, clearing the way for industry-led challenges to regulations on the books for decades.

  • February 20, 2024

    SEC Zeroes In On SolarWinds Exec In Revised Complaint

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has doubled down on its case accusing software provider SolarWinds Corp. of failing to warn the public about the cybersecurity vulnerabilities that gave rise to a 2020 hack, providing a New York federal court with more detail about the involvement of the company's chief information security officer in the alleged cover-up.

  • February 20, 2024

    NM Fire Victims Sue FEMA Over Compensation Delays

    Ten New Mexico residents with property damaged by the Hermit's Peak/Calf Canyon Fire sued the Federal Emergency Management Agency in federal court Friday, saying FEMA is not processing their claims in a timely manner, in violation of an assistance measure Congress passed for victims of the wildfire.

  • February 20, 2024

    Groups, Scholars Back Tribes In High Court Healthcare Bid

    A coalition of Native American and Alaskan Native healthcare boards and nonprofits are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse two tribes millions in administrative healthcare costs, arguing that the obligation is deeply rooted in the trust relationship between the United States and its Indigenous nations.

  • February 20, 2024

    Calif. Tribe Looks To Undo Tobacco Noncompliance Listing

    The Twenty-Nine Palms of Mission Indians is suing the U.S. government in California federal court over its decision to place the tribe on a "non-compliant list" under a law that targets illegal tobacco trafficking, arguing that its operations comply with all applicable state laws.

  • February 20, 2024

    Walgreens Defeats $200M Investor Suit Over Insulin Billing

    A Delaware vice chancellor has thrown out a stockholder derivative suit accusing Walgreens directors of ignoring an alleged scheme in which insulin pen prescriptions were overfilled and the government overbilled, ruling that the investors haven't shown that the company's top brass acted in bad faith.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fla. Gaming Pact Not Allowed Under Federal Law, Expert Says

    A Miami law school adjunct professor supporting a pair of casinos seeking to undo the Seminole Tribe of Florida's gaming agreement authorizing online sports betting has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the establishments' case or reverse a lower court decision, saying the pact violates the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.

  • February 20, 2024

    GAO Says Army Was Fair In Awarding $169M IT Upgrade Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has denied a Maryland company's protest of a $169 million information technology infrastructure modernization deal for the U.S. Army, rejecting its claim that the Army assessed a competitor's strengths while overlooking the company's despite them having similarities.

  • February 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Tosses Appeal Of Bid-Rigging Indictment

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday found that a concrete executive has to wait until after he's tried to contest his indictment by a remotely convened grand jury during the pandemic on charges of allegedly fixing prices and rigging bids for ready-mix concrete in Georgia.

  • February 20, 2024

    Restoration Architect Says Visa Denial Ignored Evidence

    A Colombian restoration architect who wants to address the affordable housing shortage in the U.S., accused immigration officials in Florida federal court of disregarding more than 1,000 pages of evidence in denying him a national interest waiver for a visa.

  • February 20, 2024

    DOL Says Fringe Benefits Cos., Execs Mismanaged Funds

    The U.S. Department of Labor accused two fringe benefits administration companies and their executives of mismanaging funds destined for government contractor employees' benefits, telling a Maryland federal court Tuesday that more than $4 million in withdrawals remains missing.

  • February 20, 2024

    Amentum Can Claim Some COVID Leave Costs From Air Force

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals has ruled that Amentum Services can partially claim increased costs under an Air Force contract based on California's COVID-19 sick leave laws but that sovereign immunity bars claims based on a military quarantine requirement.

  • February 20, 2024

    Solar Co. Preyed On Elderly Prior To DOE Loan Deal, Suit Says

    Sunnova Energy International Inc. was hit with a proposed investor class action alleging shareholders were damaged when reports revealed that it routinely engaged in predatory tactics against elderly homeowners before it entered a deal with the U.S. Department of Energy to help disadvantaged communities.

Expert Analysis

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

    Author Photo

    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

    Author Photo

    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Jurisdictional Challenges

    Author Photo

    Stephanie Magnell and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth examine three recent cases illustrating that, on top of being comprehensive and well-considered, claims submitted to contracting officers must be prepared to withstand future government motions to dismiss appeals for lack of jurisdiction.

  • New SDNY Whistleblower Program May Be A Game-Changer

    Author Photo

    A new pilot program in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York promises to immunize from prosecution certain individuals who blow the whistle on financial crimes and corruption, and if similar self-disclosure programs are any indication, this significant new policy may measurably increase white collar investigations, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

    Author Photo

    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Ex-OpenSea Staffer Case May Clarify When Info Is Property

    Author Photo

    In considering the appeal of a former OpenSea manager’s wire fraud conviction in U.S. v. Chastain, the Second Circuit may soon provide guidance about whether economic information is traditional property in certain insider trading prosecutions — a theory of fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly narrowed, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Takeaways From SEC's Aggressive Cybersecurity Moves

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's intensifying policy on cybersecurity and securities violations in the wake of a data breach — like its enforcement action against SolarWinds and its security officer — has emboldened shareholders to file related suits, creating a heightened threat to public companies, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Supplementation, Conversion, Rejection

    Author Photo

    In this month's bid protest roundup, Lyle Hedgecock and Michaela Thornton at MoFo discuss recent cases highlighting how the U.S. Government Accountability Office and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims consider supplementation of the record and an agency’s attempt to convert a sealed bid opportunity into a negotiated procurement, as well as an example of precedential drift.

  • Staying Ahead Of The AI Policymaking Curve

    Author Photo

    With artificial intelligence poised to be the hottest legislative and regulatory topic in 2024, expect the AI policymaking toolbox to continue to expand and evolve as stakeholders in the U.S. and abroad develop, deploy, use and learn more about these technologies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

    Author Photo

    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • What Cos. Can Learn From 2023 Export Enforcement Report

    Author Photo

    A January report summarizing key actions and policy changes undertaken at the Office of Export Enforcement in 2023 is a valuable indicator of future government priorities and the factors companies should consider as they conduct export operations amid what may be a turbulent international trading environment in 2024, says Thaddeus McBride at Bass Berry.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • DOJ's Biopharma Settlement Raises Anti-Kickback Questions

    Author Photo

    In the aftermath of the U.S. Department of Justice's settlement with Ultragenyx over genetic testing programs, it may be prudent to reevaluate genetic tests through the lens of the Anti-Kickback Statute and reconsider whether it is proper for free testing programs to be treated like patient assistance programs, says Mary Kohler at Kohler Health Law.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

    Author Photo

    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Government Contracts archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!