Government Contracts

  • February 20, 2024

    NM Fire Victims Sue FEMA Over Compensation Delays

    Ten New Mexico residents with property damaged by the Hermit's Peak/Calf Canyon Fire sued the Federal Emergency Management Agency in federal court Friday, saying FEMA is not processing their claims in a timely manner, in violation of an assistance measure Congress passed for victims of the wildfire.

  • February 20, 2024

    Groups, Scholars Back Tribes In High Court Healthcare Bid

    A coalition of Native American and Alaskan Native healthcare boards and nonprofits are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse two tribes millions in administrative healthcare costs, arguing that the obligation is deeply rooted in the trust relationship between the United States and its Indigenous nations.

  • February 20, 2024

    Calif. Tribe Looks To Undo Tobacco Noncompliance Listing

    The Twenty-Nine Palms of Mission Indians is suing the U.S. government in California federal court over its decision to place the tribe on a "non-compliant list" under a law that targets illegal tobacco trafficking, arguing that its operations comply with all applicable state laws.

  • February 20, 2024

    Walgreens Defeats $200M Investor Suit Over Insulin Billing

    A Delaware vice chancellor has thrown out a stockholder derivative suit accusing Walgreens directors of ignoring an alleged scheme in which insulin pen prescriptions were overfilled and the government overbilled, ruling that the investors haven't shown that the company's top brass acted in bad faith.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fla. Gaming Pact Not Allowed Under Federal Law, Expert Says

    A Miami law school adjunct professor supporting a pair of casinos seeking to undo the Seminole Tribe of Florida's gaming agreement authorizing online sports betting has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the establishments' case or reverse a lower court decision, saying the pact violates the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.

  • February 20, 2024

    GAO Says Army Was Fair In Awarding $169M IT Upgrade Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has denied a Maryland company's protest of a $169 million information technology infrastructure modernization deal for the U.S. Army, rejecting its claim that the Army assessed a competitor's strengths while overlooking the company's despite them having similarities.

  • February 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Tosses Appeal Of Bid-Rigging Indictment

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday found that a concrete executive has to wait until after he's tried to contest his indictment by a remotely convened grand jury during the pandemic on charges of allegedly fixing prices and rigging bids for ready-mix concrete in Georgia.

  • February 20, 2024

    Restoration Architect Says Visa Denial Ignored Evidence

    A Colombian restoration architect who wants to address the affordable housing shortage in the U.S., accused immigration officials in Florida federal court of disregarding more than 1,000 pages of evidence in denying him a national interest waiver for a visa.

  • February 20, 2024

    DOL Says Fringe Benefits Cos., Execs Mismanaged Funds

    The U.S. Department of Labor accused two fringe benefits administration companies and their executives of mismanaging funds destined for government contractor employees' benefits, telling a Maryland federal court Tuesday that more than $4 million in withdrawals remains missing.

  • February 20, 2024

    Amentum Can Claim Some COVID Leave Costs From Air Force

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals has ruled that Amentum Services can partially claim increased costs under an Air Force contract based on California's COVID-19 sick leave laws but that sovereign immunity bars claims based on a military quarantine requirement.

  • February 20, 2024

    Solar Co. Preyed On Elderly Prior To DOE Loan Deal, Suit Says

    Sunnova Energy International Inc. was hit with a proposed investor class action alleging shareholders were damaged when reports revealed that it routinely engaged in predatory tactics against elderly homeowners before it entered a deal with the U.S. Department of Energy to help disadvantaged communities.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fox Rothschild AI Chief Talks 'Terrifying' Deepfakes, Biased AI

    Mark McCreary, the chief artificial intelligence and information security officer at Fox Rothschild, leads his firm's internal AI strategy and provides counsel to other law firms trying to bushwhack their path through the often murky AI legal landscape, rife with hallucinated case law citations and disturbingly real deepfakes.

  • February 16, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Rethink Overturning Bid-Rigging Conviction

    The Fourth Circuit declined to reconsider a panel ruling that overturned a former Contech executive's bid-rigging conviction, despite the U.S. Department of Justice's contention that the decision flouts long-standing precedent.

  • February 16, 2024

    Nat'l Security Bar Kills Ex-Raytheon Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Fifth Circuit on Thursday refused to revive an engineer's claims that he was fired by defense contractor Raytheon for raising concerns about a naval system, saying that reviewing the case would implicate the Pentagon's protected decision to revoke his security clearance.

  • February 16, 2024

    You Want Judge Reyna To Have Coffee With Your Brief

    U.S. Circuit Judge Jimmie V. Reyna on Friday told intellectual property attorneys that the best way to establish credibility at the Federal Circuit is through a well-written brief, saying otherwise they put him in a bad position and deprive him of coffee.

  • February 16, 2024

    ​​4th Circ. Revives COVID Benefits Class Action Against BofA

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday resurrected a proposed class action brought by a recipient of government COVID-19 assistance that alleges Bank of America didn't protect his unemployment benefits, reasoning the bank account was subject to a federal law that guards government benefits.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ape Farm Says Ga. Officials Monkeying With $300M Bond Deal

    The company behind a proposed — and highly controversial — 1.75 million-square-foot monkey rearing facility in southwest Georgia has taken its fight against local officials to federal court, accusing a development authority of trying amid public outcry to back out of a $300 million bond deal to finance the project.

  • February 16, 2024

    NJ Comptroller Gets Win In Suit Seeking To Block Subpoena

    A federal judge on Thursday tossed a suit from the CEO of a police training company alleging a subpoena from the New Jersey Office of the State Comptroller, or OSC, for his video testimony was retaliatory, ruling that the federal suit makes the same arguments that were already rejected in state court.

  • February 16, 2024

    Telemedicine Exec Admits $110M Medicare Fraud Scheme

    A Florida man agreed to plead guilty to orchestrating a $110 million Medicare fraud scheme using telemedicine and telemarketing companies to generate falsified orders for knee braces and other medical equipment, Boston federal prosecutors said Friday.

  • February 15, 2024

    GAO Rejects Protests Against ICE Air Charter Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office denied two protests related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement solicitation for air charter services for transportation of noncitizens in federal custody, according to two decisions published Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-ArentFox Client Tentatively Denied Conflict Case Discovery

    A California state judge tentatively ruled on Thursday that government contractor Peraton Corp. cannot get discovery for ArentFox Schiff's work for a business rival around the time it represented Peraton, saying since the discovery bid relates to an arbitration provision in Peraton's retainer, what happened after it was inked is irrelevant.

  • February 15, 2024

    House Committee Blasts VA, Oracle For E-Record Failures

    Lawmakers on Thursday rebuked the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Oracle Corp. for inadequate fixes to electronic medical records systems that they say continue to threaten the health and safety of thousands of veterans, who are not being advised of the risk.

  • February 15, 2024

    Conn. Justice Calls Marriott Lien Fight 'An Embarrassment'

    A "bizarre" appeal that seeks the discharge of a sewer assessment lien on a Marriott hotel property is "a waste of everybody's time," a Connecticut Supreme Court justice said Thursday amid oral argument.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOI Inks Klamath Basin Agreement With Tribes, Water Users

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it has struck an agreement that will see water users and tribes work together in a push to improve the environment and water supplies in the drought-prone Klamath River Basin of southern Oregon and northern California, pledging $72 million for projects.

  • February 15, 2024

    Lincare To Pay $25.5M To Settle FCA, Anti-Kickback Litigation

    Lincare Inc. has agreed to pay about $25.5 million as part of a settlement with the Department of Justice and others resolving litigation over allegations it violated the False Claims Act and Anti-Kickback Statute by mishandling the rental of respiratory equipment to patients.

Expert Analysis

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • GAO Decision Underscores Complexity Of '180-Day Rule'

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    The Government Accountability Office's ruling last month in Washington Business Dynamics, evaluating its eligibility for a small business set-aside contract, provides an important reminder for companies to stay vigilant of developments around the evolving "180-day rule" for submitting a proposal, say Stephen Ramaley and Adam Bartolanzo at Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • How US Companies Can Wield The New Foreign Bribery Law

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    U.S. companies operating in high-risk markets can use the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act that passed last month to their advantage both in preventing bribe demands and in negotiating with the Justice Department to prevent prosecution or to receive cooperation credit, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • A Potential Proactive Tool For Public-Private Joint Ventures

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    In the current environment of heightened antitrust enforcement, the National Cooperative Research and Production Act seems tailor-made for the collaborative work among competitors encouraged by the Biden administration's infrastructure and green energy funding legislation, say Jeetander Dulani and Susan Ebner at Stinson.

  • How Gov't Use Of Suspension And Debarment Has Evolved

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    A recent report to Congress about federal agencies' suspension and debarment activities in fiscal years 2021 and 2022 shows exclusion remains a threat to government contracting businesses, though proactive engagement with suspending-and-debarring officials and alternate forms of redress are becoming more common, says David Robbins at Jenner & Block.

  • Uncharted Waters Ahead For FCA Litigation In 2024

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    Following a year of significant court decisions, settlements, recoveries and proposed amendments, 2024 promises to be a lively year for False Claims Act actions and litigation, and one that will hopefully provide more clarity as FCA jurisprudence evolves, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • What's On Tap For Public Corruption Prosecutions In 2024

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    All signs point toward another year of blockbuster public corruption prosecutions in 2024, revealing broader trends in enforcement and jurisprudence, and promising valuable lessons for defense strategy, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • The 5 Most Important Bid Protest Decisions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Bradley Arant discuss noteworthy 2023 bid protest decisions from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and U.S. Government Accountability Office, offering perspectives on standing, document production, agency deference, System for Award Management registration requirements and mentor-protégé joint venture proposal evaluations.

  • 4 Questions On Groundbreaking New Foreign Bribery Law

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    The recently enacted Foreign Extortion Prevention Act will significantly alter the anti-corruption landscape under U.S. law by allowing prosecutors to pursue foreign officials for soliciting or accepting bribes, but it’s not yet clear how the statute will be used and by whom, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • OIG Report Has Clues For 2024 Healthcare Fraud Enforcement

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    A recent report from the Health Department's Office of the Inspector General reveals healthcare fraud and abuse enforcement trends that will continue in 2024, from increased telehealth oversight to enhanced policing of managed care, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

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