Government Contracts

  • February 12, 2024

    Jury Convicts 3 Of $7.9M COVID Aid Fraud Scheme

    A Manhattan federal jury convicted three people of perpetrating a scheme to bilk $7.9 million from the U.S. Small Business Administration through COVID-19 relief applications submitted in other people's names.

  • February 12, 2024

    Fla. Atty Wants $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction Axed

    A Florida attorney convicted of conspiring to defraud a U.S. coronavirus pandemic relief program has asked a Georgia federal judge to vacate the jury's guilty verdict and either acquit her or order a new trial, arguing the government violated her due process rights by not submitting sufficient evidence to prove her guilt.

  • February 12, 2024

    Newman Cleared To Fight Law In DC, But Not Suspension

    U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman may challenge the law she has been suspended under, but she cannot get an injunction that would allow her to hear cases on the Federal Circuit again, nor fight how the law has been directly applied to her, a D.C. federal judge said Monday.

  • February 09, 2024

    House Dems Press Army For Data On Ammo Production Deal

    Two House Democrats raised concerns Thursday that the U.S. Army wasn't tracking ammunition produced in a government-owned, contractor-run plant, saying without proper oversight, ammunition in that plant could wind up in the hands of a mass shooter.

  • February 09, 2024

    SunZia Line Developer To Argue Against DOI Injunction Bid

    The developer of the proposed SunZia Southwest Transmission Project can intervene in litigation seeking to halt construction of its 550-mile powerline, a federal district court ruled, saying that disposing of the motion may impair the company's ability to protect its interests.

  • February 09, 2024

    Conn. Port Authority Cleared After 'Success Fee' Probe

    A four-year investigation sparked by allegations that the Connecticut Port Authority paid an improper "success fee" to a contractor has ended after a handful of referrals for ethical breaches and lobbying misconduct, but the fee itself was legal and no other action is forthcoming, the state's attorney general has announced.

  • February 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Disputes Newman's Filing Alleging Listserv Cut

    In response to Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's filing alleging she has been cut from the circuit's judicial listserv, the other circuit judges on Friday told the court overseeing her lawsuit challenging her suspension that they "dispute both the accuracy and relevance of those legal and factual points" in her brief.

  • February 09, 2024

    Biden Admin. Seeks Suppliers For Major Clean Energy Deals

    The Biden administration is looking for contractors to provide clean electricity to civilian and defense agencies in the mid-Atlantic and Midwest states for what it says will be one of the federal government's "largest-ever clean electricity purchases."

  • February 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs Gov't Win In Fla. University's Patent Dispute

    A Federal Circuit panel has affirmed the rejection of a Florida university's infringement suit against the U.S. government over its patent on lab mice used to study Alzheimer's disease, ruling the 1980 law governing patents developed through federally funded research can apply to work that predates a funding agreement.

  • February 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Suggests Smiley Face Could Replace Mail Patent

    A Federal Circuit panel on Friday appeared doubtful that a patent for processing undeliverable mail covers patent-eligible subject matter, with one judge saying a smiley face printed on a piece of mail could theoretically do the same thing.

  • February 09, 2024

    Government Contracts Group Of The Year: Covington

    Successfully defending against a bid protest over the U.S. Army's award of an $8 billion contract for helicopter development, Covington & Burling LLP's government contracts team was able to secure the "largest and most complex competitive procurement" in Army aviation history for Bell Textron, earning the firm a place among Law360's 2023 Government Contracts Groups of the Year.

  • February 09, 2024

    FCRA Immunity Waiver Ruling Tees Up Compliance Frenzy

    A U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the Fair Credit Reporting Act waives federal agencies' immunity from lawsuits will not only open the door to more litigation against government lenders but may also trigger housecleaning to ensure that debts are correctly reported, experts told Law360.

  • February 09, 2024

    New Report Recommends IP Commercialization Task Force

    The National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship has told the Biden administration that it should direct the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to create a task force to commercialize federal technology intellectual property and provide more IP incentives for federally funded research.

  • February 09, 2024

    Jordan Calls For Investigation Into DOJ's Deal With IRS Leaker

    House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jim Jordan is investigating whether federal prosecutors were politically motivated to allow the former IRS contractor who leaked former President Donald Trump's tax returns to plead guilty to a single count of illegal disclosure, calling the arrangement "a sweetheart deal."

  • February 09, 2024

    GE Aerospace To Pay $443K To End DOL Sex Bias Probe

    GE Aerospace will pay $443,000 to resolve the U.S. Department of Labor's allegations that it discriminated against women by failing to hire qualified female applicants to fill manufacturing operations associate positions in its Rutland, Vermont, facility, the agency said Friday.

  • February 08, 2024

    High Court Ruling Solidifies SOX Whistleblower Protections

    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous decision Thursday in favor of a UBS whistleblower has solidified whistleblower protections across a wide range of industries, with one attorney saying the ruling has made the Sarbanes-Oxley Act the most pro-employee labor law in the country.

  • February 08, 2024

    $490M FCA Verdict Against Medical Distributor Cut In Half

    A Minnesota federal judge on Thursday chopped a $490 million False Claims Act verdict against an ophthalmology distributor for making kickbacks to doctors in half, finding the compensatory damages to be "notably severe" and "grossly disproportional" to the offense under the Excessive Fines Clause.

  • February 08, 2024

    White House Patent Plan To Curb Drug Prices Draws Outcry

    A Biden administration proposal aiming to lower drug prices by using the government's authority to override patents for products developed with federal funding has drawn fierce pushback from drugmakers, universities and others who say the plan will hinder innovation.

  • February 08, 2024

    Disbarred Ex-DA Not Immune In False Felony Suit, Rival Says

    A former Colorado district attorney has urged a federal judge to keep alive his case accusing his disbarred successor and political rival of falsely charging him with felony embezzlement, while dropping some claims, arguing that absolute prosecutorial immunity or qualified immunity should not apply.

  • February 08, 2024

    Cannabis Co. Sues Colorado Regulators Over Tracking Rules

    A Colorado company that makes edible cannabis products has sued state regulators over what it describes as a confusing series of regulatory moves in recent months regarding the tracking of cannabis products and their insistence on the use of a particular tracking device through a state contractor.

  • February 08, 2024

    Watchdog Faults VA For Failing To Vet Contract Personnel

    A federal watchdog warned Thursday that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs was compromising the health and safety of veterans and its own personnel by failing to properly vet workers employed by contractors.

  • February 08, 2024

    Judge Newman Says She's Been Cut From Judicial Listserv

    The day after a national panel that reviews judicial misconduct affirmed Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's suspension for refusing to undergo medical tests as part of a probe into her mental fitness, the judge complained Thursday that she had been taken off an email list that goes to all judges.

  • February 08, 2024

    Senate Committee Advances FAA Reauthorization Bill

    A U.S. Senate panel on Thursday advanced multiyear legislation reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration's safety and airport improvement programs, while also dedicating resources to hiring more air traffic controllers and inspectors, enhancing passenger protections, and integrating more drones and so-called air taxis.

  • February 08, 2024

    DOL Seeks To Ax Challenge To New Davis-Bacon Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor has asked a Texas federal judge to toss the Associated Builders and Contractors' lawsuit seeking to stop the agency from enforcing a final rule regarding prevailing wage rates for federal construction projects, saying the group didn't show how the rule would harm its members.

  • February 08, 2024

    Ga. Judge Hits Medicare Fraud Duo With 37-Month Sentences

    A Georgia federal judge on Thursday sentenced a man and woman to 37-month prison sentences for their role in a scheme that used their marketing company to trade doctors' medical device orders and rip off Medicare for more than $1.5 million.

Expert Analysis

  • HHS Advisory Highlights Free Product Inducement Risks

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    A recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services advisory opinion highlights concerns that valuable free products and other inducements may influence patients and providers to choose one manufacturer’s product over another, notwithstanding that such free healthcare products may be a benefit, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • Bribery Bill Fills Gap In Foreign Corruption Enforcement

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    Congress recently passed the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act, significantly expanding the U.S. government's ability to prosecute foreign officials who seek or demand bribes, but if enacted, the legislation could also create tension with other nations, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray and Mayer Brown.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Contract Claims Recap: Termination and Accrual

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that illustrate why contractors should consider, during the bidding process, impediments to their ability to meet contract requirements, and the need to track the accrual dates of individual claims that may arise during performance to avoid being time-barred.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • 5 Gifts That May Run Afoul Of Government Ethics Rules

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    As the holiday season ramps up, it’s essential to keep in mind that government officials and employees are all subject to specific gift rules, and related violations can lead to consequences far worse than coal in one’s stocking, say Mark Renaud and Rob Walker at Wiley.

  • What DOD Commercial Product Rule Means For Contractors

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    A recent amendment to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, along with forthcoming changes to the definition of what constitutes a subcontract, will offer some relief for commercial products and services contractors, but the U.S. Department of Defense should do more to reduce regulatory burdens, say Daniel Ramish and Jonathan Shaffer at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Inside New Classified Contract Guidance For Joint Ventures

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    A recent Information Security Oversight Office notice clarifies the interplay between small business joint-venture rules and eligibility determinations for U.S. Department of Defense classified contracts, but it's still unclear how this should be interpreted for non-DOD procurements, says Todd Overman at Bass Berry.

  • Opinion

    Giving The Gov't Drug Patent March-In Authority Is Bad Policy

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to allow government seizure of certain taxpayer-funded drug patents is a terrible idea that would negate the benefits of government-funded research, to the detriment of patients and the wider economy, says Wayne Winegarden at Pacific Research Institute.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

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    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • Lessons From This Year's Landmark Green Energy IP Clash

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    In this year's Siemens v. General Electric wind turbine patent dispute, a Massachusetts federal court offers a cautionary tale against willful infringement, and highlights the balance between innovation, law and ethics, as legal battles like this become more frequent in the renewable energy sector, say John Powell and Andrew Siuta at Sunstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

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