Government Contracts

  • April 02, 2024

    USPTO Targeted In Brothers' Patent Litigation Campaign

    Two brothers who are software engineers and claim to have invented two-factor authorization are accusing the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office of infringing their patents with its sign-in website.

  • April 02, 2024

    Del. Justices Agree To Review Ex-Xerox Unit Coverage Row

    The Delaware Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to review a lower court's decision to set aside a jury verdict finding that an ex-Xerox unit tried to defraud its insurers into providing coverage for a portion of a $236 million Medicaid fraud-related settlement with Texas.

  • April 02, 2024

    King & Spalding Lands 3 Kasowitz Partners For Biz Litigation

    King & Spalding LLP announced Tuesday that it had hired three partners for its business litigation practice from Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP, including the co-chair of Kasowitz's real estate litigation practice group. 

  • April 02, 2024

    Okla. High Court Denies Gov.'s Veto Suit Over Tribal Compacts

    The Oklahoma Supreme Court on Tuesday denied Gov. Kevin Stitt's suit against state lawmakers over two veto overrides on tribal tobacco and motor vehicle compacts, saying the executive branch doesn't have exclusive authority to negotiate state-tribal compacts.

  • April 02, 2024

    Another Judge Says Feds Overstepped With GHG Rule

    A Kentucky federal judge has sided with Kentucky and 20 other Republican-led states, ruling that the Federal Highway Administration overstepped its authority with a rule directing states to set targets for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • April 01, 2024

    Cybersecurity Heads Back SolarWinds' Push To Nix SEC Suit

    Cybersecurity experts from dozens of private companies decried the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's lawsuit against SolarWinds and its cybersecurity head, arguing the unprecedented effort to hold the pair accountable for a 2020 cyberattack could undermine U.S. national security.

  • April 01, 2024

    Tribe, Allies Defend Standing To Fight Corps' Fish Farm Permit

    The Army Corps of Engineers is trying to "muddy the water" to fend off a challenge to a nationwide permit opening ocean waters to aquaculture operations, failing to justify why the permit shouldn't be scrapped, the Quinault Indian Nation and nonprofit allies have told a Washington federal judge.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Pharma Co. Exec Denies Signing Noncompete Deal

    The former director of government sales for a pharmaceutical company asked the North Carolina Business Court on Friday to knock out a breach of contract claim in a lawsuit that alleges he took trade secrets to a competitor, arguing the company has no valid noncompete agreement to back it up.

  • April 01, 2024

    BOP Drops Accreditation Org After IG, Sens. Raise Concerns

    The Federal Bureau of Prisons has let its $2.75 million contract with its accreditation organization expire, after a group of Democratic lawmakers and the bureau's watchdog raised concerns that the group wasn't effective or objective.

  • April 01, 2024

    DeSantis Ducks Mass. Suit Over Migrant Flights

    A Massachusetts federal judge has released Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and most other defendants from a proposed class suit by a group of migrants who claim they were duped into boarding flights to Martha's Vineyard, ruling that the court lacked jurisdiction.

  • April 01, 2024

    Colo. Judge Pleads For Brevity In Palantir Shareholder Suit

    A Colorado federal judge has dismissed without prejudice a shareholder suit against software and analytics company Palantir Technologies, criticizing the redundancy and excessive length of the complaint, and chastising the plaintiffs for seemingly expecting him to sift through alleged fraudulent statements for them.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fla. Atty Can't Escape $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A Florida attorney fell short in trying to nix her conviction for conspiracy to commit wire fraud when a Georgia federal court found the jury heard and saw a "plethora" of evidence to show she submitted fraudulent loan applications in an effort to obtain money meant to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Wary Of Defense Co.'s Late $19.4M Pension Claim

    The Federal Circuit appeared skeptical Monday of an aviation defense company's attempt to revive pension claims against the federal government, as judges on the panel questioned the implications of reviving a claim outside the six-year statute of limitations.

  • April 01, 2024

    High Court Won't Hear Mass. Residents' Tribal Land Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday denied a petition by a group of Massachusetts residents seeking to reverse a ruling that allowed the Department of the Interior to take 321 acres into trust for the development of a billion-dollar tribal hotel and casino.

  • March 29, 2024

    High Bar To Meet For Novel Protest Over $45B DOE Deal

    The U.S. Department of Energy's deviation from typical federal acquisition rules to award a $45 billion contract to a company previously deemed ineligible is raising eyebrows among government contracting attorneys, but may nonetheless find support in court.

  • March 29, 2024

    GEO Group Brass Agree To Reforms To End Derivative Suit

    Shareholders who claimed executives of private prison contractor GEO Group Inc. lied about financing deals with major banks told a Florida federal judge that the company has agreed to a host of corporate reforms to end the derivative suit, which will include the appointment of a chief compliance officer.

  • March 29, 2024

    Navy Overspent $399M In Ukraine Funding In 2022, DOD Says

    The U.S. Department of Defense said that lax financial controls in the U.S. Navy's budgeting system led it to overspend nearly $400 million in funds intended to help Ukraine following Russia's 2022 invasion, which has also increased the risk of triggering a possible Antideficiency Act violation in the future.

  • March 29, 2024

    RTX Cut From Deal Due To Worker's 'Likely' NDA Violation

    RTX Corp. can't be part of an anti-missile technology program following its hiring of a former naval analyst who may have violated a non-disclosure agreement while still employed with the Navy, a U.S. Court of Federal Claims decision unsealed Friday shows.

  • March 29, 2024

    L3Harris Accuses Moog Of Delays In Subdeals Worth $77.9M

    L3Harris Technologies Inc. has hauled fellow defense contractor Moog Inc. into Florida federal court, alleging that Moog failed to timely deliver critical satellite parts under several subcontracts worth $77.9 million, despite the U.S. government requiring expedited delivery for national defense purposes.

  • March 29, 2024

    Exxon Docs In $1.8B Case Should Be Unsealed, Judge Told

    The government asked a Texas federal judge to wave away protests by Exxon Mobil Corp. to keep its documents sealed in a case over $1.8 billion in contested tax benefits for a joint venture with Qatar, saying Thursday that the energy giant threatens unnecessary disputes at trial.

  • March 29, 2024

    Up Next After Bankman-Fried Sentencing: FTX Cooperators

    Now that FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried has been sentenced to 25 years in prison for an $11 billion fraud on the collapsed crypto exchange, it's time for the three top lieutenants who testified against him at trial to face their own judgments — and experts say the cooperators are well positioned to avoid jail time.

  • March 29, 2024

    Dominion Wants County Sanctioned In Voting Machine Row

    Dominion Voting Systems Inc. wants a Pennsylvania county to pay its legal bills over allegedly rehashed claims that its voting machines had security issues in violation of the county's contract, since a federal court had already tossed those claims.

  • March 29, 2024

    Convicted Energy Grant Fraudster Loses 1st Circ. Appeal

    The First Circuit rejected the appeal of a Massachusetts man who was convicted of submitting fraudulent applications for federal grant money under the guise of needing it for energy projects, ruling that the verdict was backed by strong evidence.

  • March 29, 2024

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Super Hornets And Chips

    This March, the Pentagon ordered a final batch of the "Top Gun: Maverick"-featured Super Hornet fighter plane from The Boeing Co., tapped IBM to create a trusted semiconductor enclave and devoted $1 billion to cracking down on nuclear smuggling abroad. These are some of the most noteworthy government contracts over the last month.

  • March 29, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Woes, Va. Ends Arena Plan, Pac-12 Deal

    In this week’s Off The Bench, MLB superstar Shohei Ohtani tries to untangle himself from a gambling scandal, Virginia’s rejection sends two D.C. pro franchises back home, and the Pac-12 pays up to two schools that were left behind. If you were sidelined this week, Law360 will catch you up with the sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Jurisdictional Challenges

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    Stephanie Magnell and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth examine three recent cases illustrating that, on top of being comprehensive and well-considered, claims submitted to contracting officers must be prepared to withstand future government motions to dismiss appeals for lack of jurisdiction.

  • New SDNY Whistleblower Program May Be A Game-Changer

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    A new pilot program in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York promises to immunize from prosecution certain individuals who blow the whistle on financial crimes and corruption, and if similar self-disclosure programs are any indication, this significant new policy may measurably increase white collar investigations, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Ex-OpenSea Staffer Case May Clarify When Info Is Property

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    In considering the appeal of a former OpenSea manager’s wire fraud conviction in U.S. v. Chastain, the Second Circuit may soon provide guidance about whether economic information is traditional property in certain insider trading prosecutions — a theory of fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly narrowed, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Takeaways From SEC's Aggressive Cybersecurity Moves

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's intensifying policy on cybersecurity and securities violations in the wake of a data breach — like its enforcement action against SolarWinds and its security officer — has emboldened shareholders to file related suits, creating a heightened threat to public companies, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Supplementation, Conversion, Rejection

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Lyle Hedgecock and Michaela Thornton at MoFo discuss recent cases highlighting how the U.S. Government Accountability Office and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims consider supplementation of the record and an agency’s attempt to convert a sealed bid opportunity into a negotiated procurement, as well as an example of precedential drift.

  • Staying Ahead Of The AI Policymaking Curve

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    With artificial intelligence poised to be the hottest legislative and regulatory topic in 2024, expect the AI policymaking toolbox to continue to expand and evolve as stakeholders in the U.S. and abroad develop, deploy, use and learn more about these technologies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • What Cos. Can Learn From 2023 Export Enforcement Report

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    A January report summarizing key actions and policy changes undertaken at the Office of Export Enforcement in 2023 is a valuable indicator of future government priorities and the factors companies should consider as they conduct export operations amid what may be a turbulent international trading environment in 2024, says Thaddeus McBride at Bass Berry.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • DOJ's Biopharma Settlement Raises Anti-Kickback Questions

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    In the aftermath of the U.S. Department of Justice's settlement with Ultragenyx over genetic testing programs, it may be prudent to reevaluate genetic tests through the lens of the Anti-Kickback Statute and reconsider whether it is proper for free testing programs to be treated like patient assistance programs, says Mary Kohler at Kohler Health Law.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • GAO Decision Underscores Complexity Of '180-Day Rule'

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    The Government Accountability Office's ruling last month in Washington Business Dynamics, evaluating its eligibility for a small business set-aside contract, provides an important reminder for companies to stay vigilant of developments around the evolving "180-day rule" for submitting a proposal, say Stephen Ramaley and Adam Bartolanzo at Miles & Stockbridge.

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