Government Contracts

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Trader Wants 'Public Servant' Cut From FCPA Case

    A former Texas oil trader accused of bribery by federal prosecutors in New York has asked a judge to reject the government's argument that employees of a U.S.-based affiliate of Mexico's state-owned oil company should be considered "public servants" under Mexico's anti-bribery law.

  • February 05, 2024

    Military Store Service Sued For Not Prioritizing Blind Vendors

    A military base store service run by the U.S. Department of Defense was sued in Texas federal court Friday for allegedly violating laws prioritizing blind merchants for opportunities to operate vending facilities on military bases when it opened a Fresh Market and other shops, while removing machines owned by blind merchants.

  • February 05, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Nabs Space Pro From Sherman & Howard

    Greenberg Traurig LLP announced Monday that it has hired former U.S. Air Force director of space law and chair of Sherman & Howard LLC's aerospace practice group Milton "Skip" Smith to head its space and satellite industry group.

  • February 05, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Adds Real Estate Vet In Miami Office

    Philadelphia-based firm Fox Rothschild LLP has welcomed a commercial real estate attorney with more than 20 years of experience to its Miami office, the firm announced Monday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Discrepancy In Co. Name Can't Sink $4.5M Army Deal Dispute

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals has allowed an Iraqi contractor to proceed with its $4.5 million dispute over alleged unpaid invoices under a construction equipment deal, rejecting the U.S. Army's arguments that the claim and contract involved two different companies.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Honeywell Engineer's Fraud, Equal Pay, Leave Suit Axed

    A former Honeywell engineer could not prove she was engaging in protected activity by calling attention to fraud under a U.S. Navy contract, an Arizona federal judge has ruled, saying flagging compliance issues is not the same as investigating fraudulent activity.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Ky. Prosecutor Convicted Of Trading Legal Favors For Sex

    A federal jury found a former Kentucky state prosecutor guilty of assisting a criminal defendant in exchange for sexual favors and explicit photos, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Saturday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Hires Wiley Atty As Gov't Contracts Lead

    Cozen O'Connor has hired a more-than 25-year veteran of Wiley Rein LLP, who joins the firm to help co-chair its government contracts practice from its Washington, D.C., office, according to a Monday announcement.

  • February 05, 2024

    States, Enviro Groups Expand Suits Over USPS' New Vehicles

    Environmentalists and a coalition of states broadened their California federal court challenges to the U.S. Postal Service's decision to replace its aging delivery fleet with "gas-guzzling vehicles" powered by internal combustion engines, saying it failed to consider lower-emission alternatives.

  • February 02, 2024

    Health Net Loses Bid To Stop $65B Contract Award

    The U.S. Department of Defense prevailed over Health Net's challenge to a $65 billion contract award to TriWest Healthcare Alliance, as a U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge ruled Friday that TriWest's bid passed fair and square.

  • February 02, 2024

    Biden's Small Biz Contract Plan In Need Of Definitive Regs

    A White House plan to include more small businesses in multiple-award government contracts could backfire if regulations to implement the plan don't define terms such as when companies can be added to the contracts or given preference for specific tasks under the contracts. 

  • February 02, 2024

    Monsanto Can't Wash Away Seattle's PCB Water Pollution Suit

    A Washington federal judge on Friday denied Monsanto's summary judgment bid in Seattle's complaint over polychlorinated biphenyl pollution in its waterways, ruling there are still significant factual disputes in play, including whether and to what extent PCBs traceable to Monsanto comprise the amount found in the city's water.

  • February 02, 2024

    US Chamber Calls SEC SolarWinds Suit An FCPA 'Power Grab'

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Friday urged a New York federal court to ax the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's suit against software provider SolarWinds Corp., saying the agency is using a provision of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act as a power grab for broader corporate policing authority.

  • February 02, 2024

    ACLU Atty On How To Protect Civil Liberties In The AI Era

    Because artificial intelligence and algorithmic systems often operate in the shadows, there's a new need for legislation, regulation and enforcement to ensure the technology doesn't undercut civil liberties by engaging in discrimination in housing, education or employment, according to Cody Venzke, senior policy counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • February 02, 2024

    Court's Claims Of Internal Dispute A Myth, Tribe Tells Fed. Circ.

    The Winnemucca Indian Colony is asking the Federal Circuit to overturn a decision that dismissed allegations in a $208 million breach of trust suit against the Bureau of Indian Affairs, saying the Court of Federal Claims wrongly characterized the events that underpinned its litigation as an internal dispute within the tribe.

  • February 02, 2024

    Mich. Prevailing Wage Policy Gets Appellate Court's Backing

    A Michigan agency did not overstep its authority when it required that workers on certain state-funded construction projects be paid a prevailing wage, an appellate court panel has ruled, finding the Legislature's repeal of the Prevailing Wage Act did not remove the agency's ability to impose certain terms on state contracts.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ga. Appeals Court Scraps Bond Order In Auto Plant Fight

    A group of Georgia residents hoping to block the construction of a $5 billion Rivian electric car plant shouldn't have been required to post a six-figure bond to continue with their litigation, a state Court of Appeals panel ruled Friday, overturning a county trial court's ruling.

  • February 02, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Donald Trump's Disqualification

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hold oral arguments in a special session Thursday to consider former President Donald Trump's bid to be reinstated to the Colorado primary election ballot.

  • February 02, 2024

    GSA Lets Contractors Claim Rising Red Sea Shipping Costs

    The U.S. General Services Administration has authorized agencies participating in its employee relocation program to reimburse shipping companies the extra costs of rerouting household goods shipments to avoid Houthi attacks on the Red Sea.

  • February 02, 2024

    Infrastructure Co. Cuts Deal To Resolve DOL Equal Pay Probe

    An infrastructure consulting company has agreed to pay roughly $122,000 to shutter a U.S. Department of Labor investigation into allegations that the company paid women less than their male counterparts despite the workers having the same levels of experience and skill, the DOL said.

  • February 01, 2024

    GAO Nixes Protests To Army's Costly Pick For $549M Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office freed the U.S. Army Materiel Command from claims it unreasonably snubbed two contractors for an installation support deal in favor of a company with a more expensive bid, saying the command justified the price differential.

  • February 01, 2024

    GAO Backs Protest Over DHS Ignoring Change On $225M Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office backed Deloitte Consulting's protest over a $225.3 million U.S. Department of Homeland Security order for support services, saying DHS wrongly failed to take into account the awardee removing a proposed teaming partner from its bid.

  • February 01, 2024

    How Will AI Impact The Environment? Dems Want To Find Out

    As attempts to integrate artificial intelligence into products and processes speed up, Congress wants a close look at how the technology's electricity use, water needs and waste consequences are affecting the environment.

  • February 01, 2024

    5 Mass. Rulings You Might Have Missed In January

    Massachusetts justices in Suffolk County's Business Litigation Session weighed in on the impact of a major ruling involving Robinhood Financial, a proposed class action on overdraft fees charged by a credit union, and two pandemic-related cases. Here are five January decisions that might have flown under the radar.

  • February 01, 2024

    Michigan Co. To Pay $5M To Resolve Army Overcharge Claims

    A Michigan company will pay $5 million to the U.S. government to resolve a former employee's whistleblower claims it overstated pricing data for subcontractor work in a deal to manufacture armored vehicle upgrades for the U.S. Army, federal prosecutors announced.

Expert Analysis

  • Best Practices For Defense Tech Startup Financing

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    Navigating the expanding and highly regulated defense technology sector requires careful planning and execution, starting at incorporation, so startups should prepare for foreign investor issues, choose their funding wisely and manage their funds carefully, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Looking For Defense Contract Appeal Trends In Annual Report

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    A deep dive into the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals annual report for the 2023 fiscal year reveals increases in the number of cases filed, pending motions and expedited or accelerated cases, while the board disposed of fewer cases than in prior fiscal years, say Scott Flesch and Alexandra Prime at Miller & Chevalier.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • SolarWinds Ushers In New Era Of SEC Cyber Enforcement

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent lawsuit against software company SolarWinds Corp. and its chief information security officer is the first time the SEC has ever filed suit over scienter-based fraud involving cybersecurity failures, illustrating that both companies and CISOs need to be extra cautious in how they describe their cybersecurity practices, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Instructions, Jurisdiction, Scrutiny

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Michaela Thornton at MoFo examines three recent protests resolved in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and the U.S. Government Accountability Office that arose from indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract awards and offer important reminders about the fundamentals of procurement law.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • A Look At Successful Bid Protests In FY 2023

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    Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin look beyond the statistics in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s recent annual report on bid protests, sharing their insights about nine categories of sustained protests, gained from reading every fiscal year 2023 decision in which the protester had a positive result.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • AI Use May Trigger False Claims Act's Public Disclosure Bar

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    The likely use of publicly available artificial intelligence tools to detect government fraud by combing through large data sets will raise complex questions about a False Claims Act provision that prohibits the filing of claims based on previously disclosed information, say Nick Peterson and Spencer Brooks at Wiley Rein.

  • Biden Climate Push Expands With Contractor GHG Focus

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    President Joe Biden's recent announcement that federal agencies will consider contractors' greenhouse gas emissions when making procurement decisions demonstrates his administration's continued interest in using government contracting as a vehicle for reducing climate-related impacts — a theme first established in the early months of his term, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Unpacking GAO's FY 2023 Bid Protest Report

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    The U.S. Government Accountability Office's recent bid protest report reflects an increase in sustained protests, illustrating that disappointed offerors may see little reason to refrain from seeking corrective action — but there is more to the story, say Aron Beezley and Patrick Quigley at Bradley Arant.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • A Closer Look At Proposed HHS Research Misconduct Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' proposed updates to its policies on research misconduct codify many well-known best practices, but also contain some potential surprises for the research community and counsel, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

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