Government Contracts

  • April 24, 2024

    3M And Ga. Utility Say $850M PFAS Cleanup Plan A No-Go

    3M, a Georgia utilities provider and carpet and chemical manufacturers told a Georgia federal judge Wednesday they shouldn't have to face an $850 million remediation plan to clean up alleged waterway contamination from forever chemicals.

  • April 24, 2024

    DOL Says Firm 'Repeatedly' Misclassified Highway Workers

    The U.S. Department of Labor recently determined that a subcontractor "repeatedly misclassified" employees who worked on 25 federal highway construction projects in Pennsylvania, according to a notice filed in Pennsylvania federal court Wednesday in a lawsuit against three construction firms.

  • April 24, 2024

    GAO Says Space Force Deal Protest Timely But Unwarranted

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled that a protest over a U.S. Space Force research support contract submitted pre-deadline but deleted by an email server was timely, but said the Space Force properly excluded the protester's deficient bid from consideration.

  • April 24, 2024

    UPMC Affiliate Can't Avoid False Claims Suit Over NIH Grant

    A research foundation affiliated with a University of Pittsburgh Medical Center hospital can't duck a former employee's claims that the foundation mishandled grant money and fired her for raising concerns, though UPMC itself is off the hook, a federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    Watchdog Says ICE Paid $25.3M For Empty Detention Space

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agreed to review its contract with private prison operator GEO Group Inc. in California after a federal watchdog found it paid $25.3 million for hundreds of unused beds.

  • April 24, 2024

    GSA Reasonably Changed Terms On Polaris IT Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has rejected a protest over the terms of an amendment to the U.S. General Services Administration's multibillion-dollar Polaris information technology procurement, saying the agency appropriately responded to an earlier court decision.

  • April 24, 2024

    Broken Promises Land Ga. Prison Officials In Contempt

    A Georgia federal judge has slapped the state's prison officials with a contempt ruling imposing fines and appointing an independent monitor after finding the state Department of Corrections has for years flouted the terms of a settlement over its treatment of prisoners in its most punitive unit.

  • April 24, 2024

    Biden Admin. Closes $362M Loan To Texas EV-Wiring Maker

    The Biden administration has finalized a $362 million loan to help pay for a Texas automotive-wiring component plant, a move intended to boost the U.S. domestic supply chain for electric vehicles.

  • April 24, 2024

    4th Circ. Revives Worker's Age Bias Suit Against IT Co.

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday reinstated a former information technology company worker's lawsuit alleging she was unlawfully fired and replaced by someone nearly 30 years her junior, saying a trial court held her to too high a standard when it threw out her case.

  • April 24, 2024

    EPA Floats $1B In School Bus, Truck Electrification Grants

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday said it would offer approximately $1 billion in grants to fund the electrification of school buses, garbage trucks and other heavy-duty commercial vehicles, another part of the Biden administration's efforts to decarbonize the U.S. transportation sector.

  • April 23, 2024

    Globetrotters Say SBA's 'Bureaucratic Hell' Cost COVID Grant

    The Harlem Globetrotters on Monday renewed their yearslong fight with the U.S. Small Business Administration over a $10 million COVID-19 relief grant, filing a new suit in D.C. federal court accusing the SBA of leaving the team in "bureaucratic hell" rather than forking over the money it's entitled to.

  • April 23, 2024

    Tracking Tech Maker Calls USPS' $282M Deal Redo Irrational

    A software company pressed the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to again order the U.S. Postal Service to redo a $281.8 million vehicle tracking deal, saying the agency's course correct ignored that one-third of the agreement had been completed.

  • April 23, 2024

    Security Concerns May Hamper AUKUS Partnership

    The U.S. Department of State is facing pressure from Congress to ease export controls to support the fledgling AUKUS defense partnership, but concerns over Australia and the U.K.'s readiness to protect U.S. weapons technology may be causing it to stall.

  • April 23, 2024

    Sharper Sustainability Rule May Strengthen Bid Protests

    A new regulation for more environmentally friendly government purchases puts teeth into a long-standing requirement for sustainable procurement, and is likely to strengthen businesses' arguments in bid protests as agencies wrestle with the full scope of the rule.

  • April 23, 2024

    Biz Owner Faces Second Jury Over Alleged VA Kickback Plot

    An Illinois business owner faced his second federal jury Tuesday as prosecutors asserted he should be convicted of wire fraud for paying kickbacks to a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs clerk in exchange for medical equipment business that included "bogus" rental fees.

  • April 23, 2024

    Judge Allows $956M Atty Fees In 3M, DuPont PFAS Settlements

    A South Carolina federal judge on Tuesday signed off on attorney fees totaling more than $956 million in settlements with 3M and DuPont over so-called forever chemicals in firefighting foam that contaminated drinking water, saying that another group of lawyers may not have been able to reach the same outcome.

  • April 23, 2024

    Nuclear Plant Contractor Inks $18.4M Deal To End FCA Claims

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday that Consolidated Nuclear Security LLC will pay $18.4 million to resolve allegations that it knowingly submitted false claims for time not worked at a nuclear weapons plant.

  • April 23, 2024

    Juvenile Facility Abuse Suits Will Move To State Court

    A trio of plaintiffs who were denied class certification for their civil rights claims against Abraxas Youth and Family Services have agreed to withdraw their federal suit against the juvenile facility operator with an eye toward refiling their remaining claims in state court.

  • April 23, 2024

    $45B DOE Deal Backed By Common Sense, Contractor Says

    A U.S. Department of Energy contractor urged the Federal Circuit to restore a $45 billion deal it won, saying the department was allowed to award the deal despite the contractor not being continuously registered in a federal award management database.

  • April 23, 2024

    3 More Charged In Iranian Hacks Of Treasury, State Depts.

    New York federal prosecutors have charged three more Iranian men for their alleged roles in a hacking campaign targeting the U.S. departments of Treasury and State as well as companies that held security clearances with the American government.

  • April 23, 2024

    Paul Hastings Transaction Security Adviser Joins V&E

    Vinson & Elkins LLP announced the hire Monday of a Paul Hastings LLP attorney with experience advising on national security laws related to foreign investment as a partner in Washington, D.C.

  • April 23, 2024

    Jury Finds Ex-Ecuadorian Official Guilty Of Money Laundering

    A Florida federal jury on Tuesday found the former comptroller of Ecuador guilty on all counts charged against him by the government, which accused him of taking millions of dollars in bribes and directing his son, a banker in Miami, to launder the money.

  • April 22, 2024

    Judge Finds Feds Own Historic Virgin Islands Resort

    A U.S. Virgin Islands federal judge has found the government owns the title to the historic Caneel Bay resort on a St. John peninsula, ruling against an operator in a dispute that arose after the resort suffered damage from back-to-back Category 5 hurricanes in 2017.

  • April 22, 2024

    Jury Hears Of Torture As Abu Ghraib Contractor Trial Wraps

    After six days of trial and three hours of deliberation, the jury for a suit accusing military contractor CACI International of conspiring to commit torture at the Abu Ghraib military prison in Iraq recessed without a verdict Monday.

  • April 22, 2024

    Miami Seaquarium Operator Fights Eviction Bid In $35M Suit

    The operator of the Miami Seaquarium is fighting an alleged attempt by Miami-Dade County to unlawfully terminate its lease, saying in a federal lawsuit it will lose $35 million from a possible eviction that occurred after the company's CEO criticized county officials in an email over the facility's condition.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Cyber Regulators Should Rely On Existing Sources Cautiously

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    New incident reporting rules proposed by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency illustrate how the use of definitions, standards and approaches from existing sources can create a complex patchwork of regulations, demonstrating that it is essential for agencies to be clear about expectations and not create unnecessary confusion, says Megan Brown at Wiley.

  • DOE Funding And Cargo Preference Compliance: Key Points

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    Under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the U.S. Department of Energy will disburse more than $62 billion in financing for innovative energy projects — and recipients must understand their legal obligations related to cargo preference, so they can develop compliance strategies as close to project inception as possible, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • 4 Ways To Refresh Your Law Firm's Marketing Strategy

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    With many BigLaw firms relying on an increasingly obsolete marketing approach that prioritizes stiff professionalism over authentic connection, adopting a few key communications strategies to better connect with today's clients and prospects can make all the difference, say Eric Pacifici and Kevin Henderson at SMB Law.

  • Tips For Balanced Board Oversight After A Cyberincident

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's cybersecurity disclosure rules, as well as recent regulatory enforcement actions bringing board governance under scrutiny, continue to push boards toward active engagement in relation to their cyber-oversight role, despite it being unclear what a board's level of involvement should be, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Breaking Down DOJ's Individual Self-Disclosure Pilot Program

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recently announced pilot program aims to incentivize individuals to voluntarily self-disclose corporate misconduct they were personally involved in, complementing a new whistleblower pilot program for individuals not involved in misconduct as well as the government's broader corporate enforcement approach, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • Why Timely Gov't Contractor Registration Renewal Is Key

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    The U.S. Government Accountability Office's recent decision in TLS Joint Venture makes clear that a lapse in System for Award Management registration, no matter how brief, renders a government contractor ineligible for a negotiated procurement, so submit renewals with plenty of time to spare, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • GSA's Carbon-Free Power Plan: Tips For Electricity Suppliers

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    The U.S. General Services Administration's recent request for information concerning its intent to acquire a large amount of carbon pollution-free electricity over the next decade in the PJM Interconnection region offers key insights for companies interested in becoming electric power suppliers to federal government agencies, say Shaunna Bailey and Nicholas Dugdale at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Interpretation And Jurisdiction

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    Edward Arnold and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine three decisions by the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that show the importance of knowing who your contracting partner is, addressing patent ambiguities in a solicitation prior to award and keeping basic contract principles in mind when evaluating performance obligations.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • New Proposal Signals Sharper Enforcement Focus At CFIUS

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    Last week's proposed rule aimed at broadening the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States' enforcement authority over foreign investments and increasing penalties for violations signals that CFIUS intends to continue expanding its aggressive monitoring of national security issues, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • The Pros And Cons Of NIST's Proposed March-In Framework

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    Recent comments for and against the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s proposed guidance on march-in rights — which permit the government to seize federally funded patents — highlight how the framework may promote competition, but could also pose a risk to contractors and universities, say Nick Lee and Paul Ragusa at Baker Botts.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

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