Property

  • February 09, 2024

    2nd Circ. Affirms Starr Can't Sue To Defend Coverage Denial

    The Second Circuit on Friday refused to revive Starr Indemnity & Liability Co.'s suit, which a district court had concluded the insurer used to defend its decision to deny a clothing company coverage for stolen and water-damaged goods.

  • February 09, 2024

    Ala. Insurer Gets Hurricane Sally Repair Coverage Suit Cut

    A Chubb unit successfully trimmed bad faith allegations from a lawsuit seeking coverage for a condominium complex that was damaged by Hurricane Sally in 2020, as an Alabama federal judge found that the condo never showed that its insurance claims were denied by the insurer.

  • February 09, 2024

    Insurer Settles $1.7M Fluorescent Sign Fire Damage Suit

    United Fire & Casualty Co. reached a settlement in its $1.7 million suit against a Texas sign-making company, resolving its bid to recover funds paid to a bed and breakfast after a fluorescent sign caught fire and damaged the property.

  • February 09, 2024

    Bad Faith Claim Rejected Again In Hurricane Ida Coverage Suit

    A Louisiana federal judge again refused to find that the insurer of a suburban New Orleans commercial property acted in bad faith in denying to cover $220,000 in damage Hurricane Ida allegedly caused in 2021.

  • February 09, 2024

    Court Says 'Catastrophe' Applies In COVID Reinsurance Cases

    A London court has allowed insurers to make claims under reinsurance contracts for business interruption losses claimed during the COVID-19 pandemic, saying that the outbreak of an infectious disease constitutes a "catastrophe" under the policy wording.

  • February 08, 2024

    Texas Adjuster No Longer To Pretend To Be Lloyd's Of London

    An insurance adjuster who hijacked the good name of British underwriting giant Lloyd's of London after blaming it for lost compensation agreed in Texas federal court to shut down businesses he opened in its name.

  • February 08, 2024

    8th Circ. Won't Revive Renter's Fire Loss Coverage Fight

    The Eighth Circuit refused Thursday to revive an Arkansas renter's fire coverage suit against her insurer, finding a district court was correct to permanently dismiss the case over what it said were willful failures to follow its orders and properly participate in discovery.

  • February 08, 2024

    Insurance Orgs. Say Bill Would Prevent CFPB Overreach

    Bipartisan legislation seeking to clarify the powers of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has drawn support from insurance regulators and industry trade groups who say the bureau has encroached upon state-based insurance regulation despite clear statutory limitations.

  • February 08, 2024

    Esurance Pockets Totaled Vehicles' Sales Tax, Suit Says

    Auto insurer Esurance stole from customers by routinely failing to cover sales tax on totaled vehicles, a policyholder said in a proposed class action filed in New York federal court.

  • February 08, 2024

    Apt. Owners Can't Avoid Arbitrating Ida Damage, Insurers Say

    Seven New Orleans-area property owners must submit their Hurricane Ida damage claims to arbitration proceedings regardless of whether one of two foreign conventions applies to the case over the other, a group of 10 insurers told a Louisiana federal court.

  • February 07, 2024

    'Family' Exclusion Nixes Coverage For Menards, 8th Circ. Says

    An Iowa Menards home improvement retailer doesn't have coverage under the insurance of a customer who launched an injury suit against it, an Eighth Circuit panel ruled in a published opinion, finding intrafamily immunity applied, even if the shopper was unrelated to the employee who allegedly dropped lumber on her.

  • February 07, 2024

    No Defense Owed For $500K Defects Dispute, Insurer Says

    A GBLI Global Indemnity unit does not owe coverage to a general contractor and subcontractor in connection with a Clearwater, Florida-area couple's bid for more than $500,000 in damages for construction defects, the insurer has told a Florida federal court.

  • February 07, 2024

    La. Pizzeria, State Farm Settle Hurricane Damages Suit

    State Farm and a Louisiana pizzeria reached an agreement in their dispute over allegations that the insurer was artificially suppressing the cost of repairs and over-depreciating losses on claims connected to damage from Hurricanes Laura and Delta, the two parties told a Louisiana federal court.

  • February 07, 2024

    No Coverage For Apt. Complex In Negligence Row, Court Told

    The owner and managers of a Kansas City, Missouri-area apartment complex can't get coverage for a proposed class action brought by its tenants over claims of putrid living conditions, an insurer told a federal court, claiming several exclusions in its policies bar any recovery.

  • February 07, 2024

    Fla. Aircraft Co.'s Claims Narrowed In Hurricane Coverage Suit

    A Florida federal judge pumped the brakes on some of a Florida aircraft company's claims against its insurer related to its relocation in 2017 after Hurricane Irma, saying the company can't introduce previously concealed damages in the nearly $250,000 dispute. 

  • February 06, 2024

    Church Urges 5th Circ. To Affirm $2M Hurricane Coverage Win

    Church Mutual Insurance Co. may not like the $2 million judgment a Louisiana federal judge handed down over unpaid hurricane damages, but there's no ground to disturb the award, the First United Pentecostal Church in DeQuincy has told the Fifth Circuit.

  • February 06, 2024

    Investment Report Shows Cost Of Delaying Climate Action

    Insurers could face billions of dollars in losses if they continue with their current courses of investments that contribute to climate change, according to a new analysis by insurance regulators from California, Oregon and Washington.

  • February 06, 2024

    Appeals Court Upholds Insurers' COVID-19 Coverage Win

    A Texas state appeals court upheld on Tuesday a decision that a pollution and contamination exclusion prevents coverage for Baylor College of Medicine's COVID-19-related losses.

  • February 06, 2024

    Complex Not Covered For $4M Shooting Claim, Insurer Says

    A Nationwide unit told a Georgia federal court it doesn't owe coverage to an Atlanta apartment complex for a tenant's bid to hold it liable for injuries she suffered during a shooting, claiming the complex waited nearly a year to notify the insurer.

  • February 05, 2024

    Fla. Legislative Session: Property Insurance Bills Roundup

    Florida lawmakers have put forward dozens of proposals to address insurance challenges in the state, from a bill that would expand coverage from the state's last resort insurer to another that contemplates mangroves as bulwarks against flooding.

  • February 05, 2024

    Insurer Owes $1.3M In Defects Row Defense Costs, Co. Says

    A Hartford unit owes a Chicago-area homebuilder more than $1.3 million in unpaid defense costs related to an underlying construction defect suit, the company told an Illinois federal court, claiming the insurer has refused to explain its coverage decisions.

  • February 05, 2024

    BNSF Railway Blamed For Triggering 2023 Wash. Wildfire

    A tenant who lost his belongings in a blaze last summer that destroyed 10 homes and burned more than 500 acres in Washington state blamed BNSF Railway in state court for negligently running a "fire prone train" through a hot, dry, overgrown area, igniting the Tunnel 5 Fire.

  • February 05, 2024

    Insurer Owes $2.5M For Lost Income, Shop Owner Says

    A Hartford unit refused to pay out $2.5 million in business interruption coverage for a New York City doughnut shop's income that was lost while the city shut the store down during repairs, the shop told a New York federal court.

  • February 02, 2024

    Calif. Rate Approvals Centered In Coverage Crisis Debate

    A California law permitting public challenges to proposed premium increases is saving policyholders billions of dollars, a consumer advocacy group recently reported, a claim that has drawn scorn from industry professionals amid efforts to change the law to better favor carriers. 

  • February 02, 2024

    Owner Says Insurer Can't Dodge Tenn. Hooters Bombing Row

    The insurer of a Hooters restaurant that was decimated in a 2020 Christmas Day bombing appointed a crooked appraiser who tainted a damage award, the historic property's owner told a Tennessee Federal Court, adding that the biased determination was invalid under state law.

Expert Analysis

  • Cyber Rulings Aren't Helping COVID Biz Interruption Cases

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    Where policyholders have recently tried to draw comparison between the loss of property use from a COVID-19 shutdown order and the loss of data use from a ransomware attack, they have found courts unsympathetic to these arguments for business interruption insurance coverage, say Jane Warring and Kristian Smith at Zelle.

  • Insurance Commissioner's Agenda: NY On Industry Diversity

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    My Chi To, executive deputy superintendent of the New York State Department of Financial Services Insurance Division, discusses steps her agency is taking to promote diversity, equity and inclusion within the insurance industry and suggests practices for companies to consider adopting.

  • How Dealmakers Can Bridge M&A Differences In US, Europe

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    As business continues to heat up globally, differing practices and norms in mergers and acquisitions can lead to misunderstandings between U.S. and European dealmakers, but a comparison of documentation structures and processes can help avert these complications, say Piotr Korzynski and Piotr Jaskiewicz at Baker McKenzie.

  • Insurance Considerations Amid Increased Use Of Drones

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    The growing use and rapidly evolving regulation of drone technology across industries raise tricky insurance coverage questions and increase exposure to third-party liability and first-party loss, say attorneys at Covington & Burling.

  • 9th Circ. COVID Coverage Ruling Misapplies Burden Of Proof

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in Mudpie v. Travelers Casualty Insurance, dismissing a COVID-19 insurance coverage claim, incorrectly applied the burden of proof to the policyholder instead of the insurer, disregarding the crucial differences between third-party liability and first-party all-risks insurance policies, says Lee Epstein at Flaster Greenberg.

  • No Signs Of Turning, Tide Of Insurer COVID Wins Persists

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    The trend of COVID-19 business interruption decisions favoring insurers continues to hold strong — any commentary to the contrary is striking a narrative that is not borne out by reality, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • How Law Firms Can Rethink Offices In A Post-Pandemic World

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    Based on their own firm's experiences, Kami Quinn and Adam Farra at Gilbert discuss strategies and unique legal industry considerations for law firms planning hybrid models of remote and in-office work in a post-COVID marketplace.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Aids Policyholder Deductible Calculations

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    In its recent McDonnel Group v. Starr Surplus Lines Insurance decision, the Fifth Circuit held that the policy's flood deductible language was ambiguous, providing a win for policyholders and a helpful mathematical interpretation for insureds with similar deductible language in their property insurance policies, says Tae Andrews at Miller Friel.

  • COVID-19 Offers Cautionary Tales On Hospitality Contracts

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    Hotel owners should look closely at the agreements that govern hotel investment and operation to learn lessons from the pandemic and to protect against such vulnerability in the future with force majeure clauses and other provisions, say Anthony Cavanaugh and Jiah Park at Miles & Stockbridge.

  • What Mainstreaming Of Litigation Finance Means For Industry

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    The rush of new capital and investors into the litigation funding space is expected to bring heightened competition on price and other key deal terms, but litigants will need to be more in tune with individual financiers' proclivities, says William Weisman at Therium Capital Management.

  • After Ida, A Look At Sandy's Flood Insurance Lessons

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    The flood insurance experience gained in connection with Superstorm Sandy can offer valuable lessons to those that have suffered a flood loss from the recent Hurricane Ida, and can guide others before and after the next storm, say Lee Epstein and Matthew Goldstein at Flaster Greenberg.

  • Federal Courts Make 2 Basic Errors In Virus Coverage Rulings

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    Many federal courts deciding dispositive motions in COVID-19 business interruption coverage cases are neglecting fundamental precepts of civil procedure by acting as fact-finders or failing to defer to forum state decisions, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Lifting The Veil On The Supreme Court's Shadow Docket

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    Following headline-making U.S. Supreme Court emergency orders on Texas’ new abortion law, COVID-19 restrictions and more, Vetan Kapoor, counsel to Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, examines the court's so-called shadow docket and its decision-making procedures, including questions around transparency, timing and precedential effect.

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