Project Finance

  • February 15, 2024

    FERC Churn Won't Impact Grid Policy Push, Chair Says

    A looming commissioner departure that could leave the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission without enough members to fully function is not affecting efforts to finalize a long-awaited overhaul of the agency's electric transmission planning policies, Chair Willie Phillips said Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Baker McKenzie Can't Send Malpractice Suit To London

    An Illinois state appeals court has rejected a push by Chicago-based Baker McKenzie to transfer to London a legal malpractice suit accusing the international law firm of botching a client's bid to reacquire a coal mine in Russia, saying in a 2-1 decision that Cook County has an interest in deciding the case even if the alleged misconduct stems from attorneys in a Russian member firm.

  • February 15, 2024

    New York Says Thruway Doesn't Cut Through Cayuga Land

    New York state officials are asking a federal district court to dismiss litigation by the Cayuga Nation that seeks a cut of the tolls collected on the New York State Thruway, arguing that the tribe can't prove it had possession of the land over which the highway was being built.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOI Inks Klamath Basin Agreement With Tribes, Water Users

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it has struck an agreement that will see water users and tribes work together in a push to improve the environment and water supplies in the drought-prone Klamath River Basin of southern Oregon and northern California, pledging $72 million for projects.

  • February 14, 2024

    USDA Says $20M Will Help Tribes Access Climate Market

    Federally recognized tribes and Alaska Native corporations and villages are getting a $20 million bump to broaden their access to emerging climate markets as a way to address ongoing climate change, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Must Distribute School IT Funds, Tech Firms Tell DC Circ.

    Two tech companies are calling on the D.C. Circuit to force the Federal Communications Commission to release funds to pay for information technology and broadband services the firms provide in elementary and secondary schools around the country.

  • February 14, 2024

    Investors Urge Prison As Developers Seek More Briefing Time

    Two real estate developers on Wednesday asked for more time to respond to EB-5 investors' request that they be imprisoned for hiding their money instead of paying overdue settlements and sanctions judgments, telling an Illinois federal judge their attorney wrote down the court's deadline incorrectly.

  • February 14, 2024

    Energy Co. Says Tribal Court Being Used To Duck $12M Award

    Merit Energy Operations is asking a federal district court to block two Wyoming tribes from using the tribal judicial system to vacate a $12.6 million arbitration award against them, saying the move is a blatant attempt to escape the ultimate result in the case.

  • February 14, 2024

    Spain Says €23.5M Award To Japanese Co. Can't Be OK'd

    Spain is urging a D.C. federal court to nix a Japanese investor's petition to enforce a €23.5 million ($25.2 million) arbitral award it won after Madrid dialed back economic incentives for renewable energy projects, arguing that doing so would force the country to violate European Union law.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ill. Judge Says Rezoning Of Historic Hotel Damaged Developer

    An Illinois federal judge found that the city of Chicago improperly zoned the historic Pittsfield Building for strictly residential use not long after agreeing with the former owner and developer to zone the property for a new hotel.

  • February 14, 2024

    Feds, Power Line Developer Decry Tribes' Suit As 'Too Late'

    The federal government and SunZia Transmission LLC, the developer of a 550-mile power line, urged an Arizona federal judge Tuesday to deny a request from tribes and conservations groups for a preliminary injunction halting the project's construction, saying they waited too long to make their challenge.

  • February 14, 2024

    NJ Mayor Gets Voice In NY Congestion Pricing Fight

    A New Jersey mayor who recently failed to get his lawsuit over New York's congestion pricing plan merged with another case brought by the Garden State government will be allowed to participate in oral arguments against the Empire State, a federal judge has decided.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-Cognizant Execs Fight Co.'s Bid To Shield Bribe Evidence

    Two former Cognizant executives have called on a New Jersey federal court to reject the company's attempt to shield evidence related to a purported bribe as the executives face a criminal trial over a separate bribery scheme.

  • February 14, 2024

    11th Circuit Urged To Toss Ga. Developer's Truck Stop Suit

    Georgia's Rockdale County is asking the Eleventh Circuit to uphold its victory over a developer's suit against a local zoning ordinance that blocked his QuikTrip truck stop project near Interstate 20.

  • February 13, 2024

    Feds Want 'Free Pass' Out Of Climate Suit Trial, Youths Say

    Twenty-one plaintiffs suing to force the U.S. government to curb fossil fuel use and cut carbon emissions told the Ninth Circuit on Monday that the government's latest attempt to pause their lawsuit amounts to its shunning procedural rules and asking for "a free pass out of trial" not available to other people.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ship Co. Seeks 5th Circ. Redo On $200M Award Enforcement

    A German shipowner has asked the Fifth Circuit to reconsider whether to enforce a $200 million arbitral award it won following a deadly chemical explosion on its vessel, saying it never had a chance to respond to the argument that ultimately led to the decision.

  • February 13, 2024

    NH Power Plant Says Electricity Deal Is Leaving It Broke

    The operator of a biofuel power plant in New Hampshire received the go-ahead from a Delaware bankruptcy judge Tuesday to keep the lights on for another week while it negotiates over a contract the debtor insists is forcing it to produce electricity for free.

  • February 13, 2024

    Apache Agrees To Pay $4M For Air Pollution Violations

    Apache Corp. reached a deal Tuesday with the federal government and New Mexico to pay $4 million in civil penalties over allegations the company failed to capture and control air emissions from its oil and gas production operations.

  • February 13, 2024

    Squabble Heats Up Over Plans To Move DC NBA, NHL Teams

    Billionaire Ted Leonsis' efforts to dislodge his sports teams Washington Wizards and Washington Capitals from the District of Columbia, and put down stakes in Virginia have run into resistance, including from a Virginia state senator and the mayor of Washington, D.C.

  • February 13, 2024

    Calif. Clean Energy Storage Secures $350M From Blackstone

    Arevon Energy Inc. said Tuesday that it closed on financing for a California renewable energy storage facility, including $350 million from a Blackstone unit in the form of preferred equity, with guidance from three law firms.

  • February 13, 2024

    Tribes Seek Split Arguments In High Court Healthcare Dispute

    Two Native American tribes are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to allow them to separately argue their positions in seeking to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse them millions in administrative healthcare costs, adding that the issues presented in the case are at the core of their ability to perform a critical service on their reservation lands.

  • February 13, 2024

    Biden Offshore Leasing Plan Faces Legal Heat On All Sides

    The Biden administration faces dueling D.C. Circuit challenges from the oil and gas industry and environmental advocates over its scaled-back offshore leasing program for 2024-2029.

  • February 13, 2024

    DC Circ. Again Nixes Challenge To FERC Pipeline Powers

    The D.C. Circuit has reinstated its prior judgment affirming a lower court's dismissal of Virginia landowners' constitutional challenge to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's approval of the Mountain Valley Pipeline, nearly a year after the U.S. Supreme Court remanded the case.

  • February 13, 2024

    Bourbon Co. Says Ky. City Caved To Whiskey Fungus Fear

    A bourbon-maker has sued the city of Williamstown, Kentucky, and its top officials in federal court after they backed out of a deal to help build a set of warehouses to age liquor in response to concerns from residents that ethanol from the facility could feed the spread of so-called whiskey fungus nearby.

Expert Analysis

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Energy Trading Cos. Must Review Electronic Comms Policies

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    After recent enforcement actions by U.S. and U.K. regulators against energy trading firms — and with the possibility of action by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission looming — companies involved in energy markets must take steps to review and strengthen electronic communications protocols, say Tanya Bodell and Christopher Hoyle at StoneTurn.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • UN Climate Summit: What To Watch For In Dubai

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    The upcoming 28th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, or COP28, may be remembered as a turning point in the emerging low-carbon economy — but only if conference commitments are successfully translated into new laws, business practices and financial support, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • New FCC Broadband Label Rules Should Be Read Carefully

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    A recent order from the Federal Communications Commission clarifies standardized broadband label requirements that are pending final approval — and while compliance should be manageable, the rules impose new risk, particularly with regard to speed and latency disclosures, say Craig Gilley and Laura Stefani at Venable.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • What FERC-PJM Negotiations Mean For The Energy Industry

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    Following the aftermath of Winter Storm Elliot, disputes associated with the PJM Interconnection settlement negotiations taking place at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission have brought to the fore a potential legal minefield arising out of extreme weather events that could lead to commercial risks for power generating companies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Kentucky Tax Talk: Taking Up The Dormant Commerce Clause

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    Attorneys at Frost Brown examine whether the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to review Foresight Coal Sales v. Kent Chandler to consider whether a Kentucky utility rate law discriminates against interstate commerce, and how the decision may affect dormant commerce clause jurisprudence.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Australia

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    Clive Cachia and Cathy Ma at K&L Gates detail ESG-reporting policies in Australia and explain how the country is starting to introduce mandatory requirements as ESG performance is increasingly seen as a key investment and corporate differentiator in the fight for global capital.

  • Bat's Newly Endangered Status Likely To Slow Development

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    A recent change in the classification of the northern long-eared bat from "threatened" to "endangered" could have significant effects on development in large portions of the Eastern and Southeastern U.S. — and in the absence of straightforward guidelines, developers will have to assess each project individually, says Peter McGrath at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Corporate Compliance Lessons From FirstEnergy Scandal

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    Fallout from a massive bribery scheme involving Ohio electric utility FirstEnergy and state officeholders — including the recent sentencing of two defendants — has critical corporate governance takeaways for companies and individuals seeking to influence government policymaking, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

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