Project Finance

  • February 05, 2024

    'Just Good Enough' Won't Cut It With BEAD Plans, Gov't Told

    Cable industry groups want the U.S. Department of Commerce, which is in charge of disbursing billions in broadband deployment aid, to reject states' efforts to build out other technologies at the expense of the fiber-optic projects the government has said they should prioritize.

  • February 05, 2024

    FERC Says It Followed Court's Orders With LNG Reapproval

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defended its reapproval of a Texas liquefied natural gas terminal Monday, telling the D.C. Circuit it addressed the appeals court's concerns after the court ordered the agency to revise its environmental reviews of the project.

  • February 05, 2024

    State Telecom Roundup: The States With The Worst Internet

    The Biden administration has said it expects to start releasing some of the $42 billion in Broadband Equity, Access, and Deployment program state broadband funding in early 2024. The idea is for the funds to be used to narrow the digital divide that prevents millions of Americans from having access to affordable and high-quality internet, but some states have more to do than others.

  • February 05, 2024

    States, Businesses Push To Sink Feds' Amended WOTUS Rule

    Texas, Idaho and more than a dozen industry groups are asking a Texas federal judge to throw out the U.S. government's latest rule to define the "waters of the United States," arguing that it oversteps federal authorities under the Clean Water Act, is overly vague and flies in the face of a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

  • February 02, 2024

    Clean Energy Can Revive Fossil Fuel Sites, But Risks Abound

    Building clean energy projects on the sites of shuttered or aging coal- and gas-fired power plants is a multibillion-dollar opportunity to accelerate the U.S. energy transition, but there are steep legal and practical hurdles to clear. Here's a rundown of what developers must grapple with if they want to build green on fossil fuel sites.

  • February 02, 2024

    Youths Say DOJ Using Extreme Tactics To Delay Climate Trial

    Young people who claim the U.S. government is violating their rights with energy policies that are worsening climate change hit back against the Justice Department's latest bid to pause their suit before it can go to trial, saying courts should not tolerate its extreme delay tactics and shocking conduct.

  • February 02, 2024

    Infrastructure Co. Cuts Deal To Resolve DOL Equal Pay Probe

    An infrastructure consulting company has agreed to pay roughly $122,000 to shutter a U.S. Department of Labor investigation into allegations that the company paid women less than their male counterparts despite the workers having the same levels of experience and skill, the DOL said.

  • February 02, 2024

    Troutman Pepper Nabs FERC Pro From Steptoe

    Troutman Pepper has nabbed a former Steptoe LLP partner to lead its enforcement practice in its energy practice group, further strengthening its over 20-member Federal Energy Regulatory Commission team.

  • February 02, 2024

    Mich. Electric Co. Can't Put Upgrade Delay Cost On Customers

    An electric company cannot pass the extra costs of construction delays during a power plant upgrade onto customers, an appellate panel said Thursday, affirming a Michigan regulator's decision that the utility must eat the loss.

  • February 01, 2024

    Colo. Climate Case May Be Stuck In 'Catch-22,' Judge Says

    A Colorado state judge asked Exxon on Thursday whether its argument would put local governments seeking to hold it responsible for the effects of climate change in a "Catch-22," since the oil giant maintains that its emissions were too widespread to be subject to state law while federal law doesn't give the plaintiffs an opportunity to sue.

  • February 01, 2024

    Kirkland Under Chancery Fire In Space Biz Merger Suit

    Scant disclosures from Kirkland & Ellis LLP about its partners' potential financial stake in a $1.2 billion deal the firm was advising drew sharp scrutiny from Delaware's Court of Chancery at a hearing in Wilmington on Thursday.

  • February 01, 2024

    Ariz. Tribes Push To Halt Work On SunZia Line

    Two tribes and conservation groups are urging an Arizona federal judge to pause construction on a 550-mile power transmission line approved by the U.S. Department of the Interior before the work damages historic and cultural resources they claim the government failed to properly assess and safeguard.

  • February 01, 2024

    Oil Price Cap Coalition Outlines Top Evasion Tactics

    The countries behind the Russian oil price cap, or OPC, issued new guidance Thursday outlining the primary tactics used to evade the $60 per barrel limit, including the increasing use of byzantine corporate structures to hide prohibited transactions.

  • February 01, 2024

    Alaska Tribes Seek Canada Recognition To Consult On Mines

    A group of tribal governments in southeast Alaska is asking Canadian regulators to acknowledge its historic presence along the boundary-crossing Unuk River, in order to protect the watershed from open-pit gold and silver mining Skeena Resources Ltd. is proposing in British Columbia.

  • February 01, 2024

    Enbridge Unit Denied Land Transfer For Texas Pipeline

    A Texas federal judge on Thursday rejected as premature an Enbridge Inc. unit's immediate land transfer request to conduct environmental surveys for a federally approved 137-mile-long natural gas pipeline project, following the company's unsuccessful attempts to contact the landowners.

  • February 01, 2024

    Energy Co. Seeks Final $12.6M Award For Tribal Equipment

    Merit Energy Operations is asking a federal district court to enter judgment after an arbitration panel determined that two Wyoming Native American tribes must pay $12.6 million to purchase equipment from the company after a lease agreement to operate on reservation land expired.

  • February 01, 2024

    Broadband Coalition Asks NTIA To Help Lower Pole Costs

    If the National Telecommunications and Information Administration wants the $42.5 billion BEAD program to achieve its goals of internet for all, the agency will have to prioritize putting rules in place that allow telecoms fair and affordable access to utility poles, a coalition argues.

  • January 31, 2024

    Solar CEO Says Feds Skimped On Offshore Wind Farm Review

    A solar developer fighting federal approvals for an offshore wind project taking shape off Massachusetts told the First Circuit the government took an improper "slice and dice" approach to conclude that construction would not significantly harm endangered North Atlantic right whales.

  • January 31, 2024

    Biden Climate Team Gains New Int'l Aide, EPA Air Leader

    In significant moves for the Biden administration's climate agenda, the White House on Wednesday said John Podesta will replace John Kerry as President Joe Biden's top international climate change policy adviser and the U.S. Senate confirmed Biden's pick to lead the Environmental Protection Agency's air office.

  • January 31, 2024

    Raymond James Can't Avoid Bankruptcy Trust's Bond Claims

    The Fifth Circuit denied Raymond James & Associates' argument that it should be defended by a pre-bankruptcy indemnity agreement on the claims regarding its alleged misstatements to investors while reselling $300 million in bonds of wood maker Louisiana Pellets.

  • January 31, 2024

    11th Circ. Weighs Legality Of Grant Contest For Black Women

    A conservative group asked the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to reverse an order rejecting its bid to temporarily block an Atlanta-based venture capital firm from operating a grant contest for Black female business owners, arguing that the contest violates civil rights law and is not a protected form of speech, as the firm claims.

  • January 31, 2024

    Feds Urged To Adopt EV Battery Tracing For Tax Credit Rules

    A mechanism to trace the source of battery materials in electric vehicles would help enforce manufacturers' compliance with the domestic content requirements that are now linked to the EV consumer tax credit, stakeholders told U.S. Treasury Department and IRS officials Wednesday.

  • January 31, 2024

    Tribes, Enviro Orgs. Try To Join Tongass Roadless Rule Fight

    A coalition of tribes, conservation groups, fishers and tourism businesses is pushing to help defend a 2023 rule that reinstated roadless area protections for about 9 million acres in Tongass National Forest and is now being challenged by Alaska, power companies and business and industry groups.

  • January 31, 2024

    Power Cos. Tell 3rd Circ. FERC Was Locked Into Auction Rules

    Electricity providers told a Third Circuit panel in oral argument Wednesday that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission improperly changed its rules on the fly in 2023 in order to tweak the results of a PJM Interconnection electricity capacity auction, arguing that once the auction procedures were set, the agency should have been bound to stick with them.

  • January 31, 2024

    Treasury Aims To Finish Credit Monetization Rules In 2024

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury aims to issue final rules this year on two new ways to monetize tax credits tied to clean energy construction projects, known as the direct pay and transferability methods, an official said.

Expert Analysis

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • What To Expect After Colo. Nixes Special Standing Rules

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    Two recent Colorado Supreme Court decisions have abandoned a test to preclude standing in lawsuits challenging government decisions brought by subordinate government entities, which will likely lead to an admixture of results, including opening the door to additional legal challenges between government entities, says John Crisham at Crisham & Holman.

  • What Texas Business Court Could Mean For Oil, Gas Cases

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    While the new business court in Texas might seem an ideal venue for the numerous oil and gas disputes litigated in that state, many of these cases may remain outside its reach under the rules governing the court's jurisdiction — at least for now, say Conrad Hester and Emily Fitzgerald at Alston & Bird.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: South Korea

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    Numerous ESG trends have materialized in South Korea in the past three years, with impacts ranging from greenwashing prevention and carbon neutrality measures to workplace harassment and board diversity initiatives, say Chang Wook Min and Hyun Chan Jung at Jipyong.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Biden Climate Push Expands With Contractor GHG Focus

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    President Joe Biden's recent announcement that federal agencies will consider contractors' greenhouse gas emissions when making procurement decisions demonstrates his administration's continued interest in using government contracting as a vehicle for reducing climate-related impacts — a theme first established in the early months of his term, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • House Bill Could Help Resolve 'Waters Of US' Questions

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    Legislation recently introduced in the U.S. House that would restore Clean Water Act protection to areas excluded from it by the U.S. Supreme Court's Sackett v. EPA decision faces an uphill battle, but could help settle the endless debates over the definition of "waters of the United States," says Richard Leland at Akerman.

  • Calif. Climate Disclosure Laws: Next Steps For Companies

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    A trio of new climate disclosure laws in California will impose far-reaching corporate reporting requirements — so companies doing business in the state must immediately begin working to substantiate their climate claims and update marketing materials, and consider getting involved in rulemaking that will shape the legislation's impact, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • California's Offshore Turbine Plans Face Stiff Headwinds

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    To realize its innovative plans for floating offshore wind farms, California will face numerous challenges as companies investing in the industry will be looking for permitting transparency, predictable timelines, and meaningful coordination between jurisdictions, agencies, and stakeholders, say David Smith and David McGrath at Manatt.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: The UK

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    Following Brexit, the U.K. has adopted a different approach to regulating environmental, social and governance factors from the European Union — an approach that focuses on climate disclosures by U.K.-regulated entities, while steering clear of the more ambitious objectives pursued by the EU, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

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